Vaccines Anchor

Vaccines

Does Georgetown University have a COVID-19 vaccination requirement?

Yes. Georgetown University requires students, faculty, staff and visitors to have received a primary series (e.g., two doses of an mRNA vaccine) and, when eligible, an additional dose of a COVID-19 vaccine (first booster), or to have an approved medical or religious exemption.

This requirement applies to:

  • All faculty and staff, including teleworking employees; 
  • Students enrolled in one or more in-person courses;
  • Students enrolled in any online or hybrid courses that have an in-person component on campus or at an off-campus location used by Georgetown for course instruction (including but not limited to students enrolled in an online nursing program who will complete an Objective Clinical Intensive (OCI)); and
  • Visitors to University-owned, operated or leased buildings in the United States.

The University’s COVID-19 vaccination requirement will continue to be updated as public health conditions evolve.

Please visit the University’s COVID-19 Vaccines web page for more information.

Why is the University requiring students, faculty, staff and visitors to be vaccinated against COVID-19? 

Vaccination is one of the most important tools to protect members of our community from the potentially serious health consequences of COVID-19 and to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Current evidence has shown that an additional dose (booster) substantially increases our immune response, including to the Omicron variant, and data from around the world has shown that having received the entire series (i.e., primary series and, when eligible, an additional dose) helps prevent severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19.

Which COVID-19 vaccines will meet Georgetown’s COVID-19 vaccine requirement?

Georgetown will accept vaccines either authorized for emergency use or granted approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the World Health Organization (WHO). 

The CDC allows mixing and matching vaccines, and the additional doses may be different than the original vaccine series.

How do I provide documentation of my vaccination?

Students, faculty and staff must submit documentation of their COVID-19 vaccination (e.g., CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card) through the GU360 mobile app or GU360 website. Please follow these instructions to submit your documentation.

Visitors to University-owned, operated or leased buildings in the United States will need to follow the instructions on the Event and Visitor Guidelines page.

Where can I see if I’m in compliance with the COVID-19 vaccination requirement?

You may view your COVID-19 vaccination compliance status at the top of the home screen in the GU360 mobile app or on the GU360 website. For more information, please click on the box and then click the “Compliance Status Details” box on the next screen. Please contact hoyavaxa@georgetown.edu if you have any questions about your compliance status.

Should I get a second additional COVID-19 vaccine dose (second booster)?

While Georgetown’s COVID-19 vaccination requirement remains the same, we strongly recommend that individuals who are 50 years and older or who are moderately or severely immunocompromised get a second additional dose (second booster).If you decide to receive a second additional dose, please upload documentation of this dose through the GU360 mobile app or GU360 website.

What should I do if I was vaccinated recently and am not yet eligible for a booster shot?

Students, faculty, staff and visitors who have been vaccinated recently and are not yet eligible to get the additional shot are up to date on vaccination and do not need to take any action at this time. They will receive a reminder email when they become eligible for an additional dose, at which time they will need to get a booster shot and submit documentation.

How do I request a medical or religious exemption? 

Students may request a medical or religious exemption from the COVID-19 vaccination requirement by completing the exemption request form and submitting the information required. 

Faculty and staff may request a medical exemption to the COVID-19 vaccination requirement by completing the Disability Accommodation Request for Employees form and submitting the information required.

Faculty and staff may request a religious exemption by completing the Religious Accommodation form.

Please visit the Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity and Affirmative Action website for more information about requesting accommodations.

If a medical or religious waiver is granted, the student or employee will receive an individualized accommodation with information on the public health measures that they will need to take, which will include following the University’s COVID-19 Testing Protocol and COVID-19 Mask Guidelines for unvaccinated individuals, as well as quarantine requirements as specified by the CDC and DC Department of Health.

Will students or employees who are exempt from the COVID-19 vaccine requirement be able to come to campus?

Yes. If a medical or religious waiver is granted, the student or employee will receive an individualized accommodation with information on the public health measures that they will need to take, which will include following the University’s COVID-19 Testing Protocol and COVID-19 Mask Guidelines for unvaccinated individuals, as well as quarantine requirements as specified by the CDC and DC Department of Health.

What is the Novavax vaccine?

The FDA issued an emergency use authorization for a new COVID-19 vaccine called Novavax on July 13, 2022. On July 19, 2022, the CDC recommended, after a unanimous vote by its vaccine advisory committee, use of Novavax as another primary series option. The vaccine is approved for adults 18 years and older. This is a two-dose vaccine – given 3-8 weeks apart – that uses a different technology, as compared to previously available vaccines that use mRNA or viral-vector technology, to protect individuals against COVID-19. Novavax has been used in more than 40 countries and is also approved for use by the WHO and the European CDC.

Novavax is recommended as a primary series for individuals who have not yet received any doses of a COVID-19 vaccine. It has not yet been authorized for use as a booster.

Novavax provides another option for people who are allergic to one or more of the components in mRNA (Moderna and Pfizer) or viral-vector (Johnson & Johnson or AstraZeneca) vaccines.

When will the Novavax vaccine be available?

The Novavax vaccine is expected to be available in local pharmacies in the U.S. in August 2022. Information about Novavax availability can be found at vaccines.gov.

How is the Novavax vaccine different from the mRNA or Johnson & Johnson vaccines?

The Novavax vaccine’s mechanism of action is different from any of the other COVID-19 vaccines (e.g., mRNA or viral-vector). It is based on a protein-subunit technology that has been in use for more than 30 years and is similar to the technology used for the flu and whooping cough vaccines.

Novavax’s ingredients do not include gelatin, metals, latex, food proteins or antibiotics. The purified protein subunit is generated in moth cells, and the adjuvant that is added to boost the immune response to the protein is derived from tree bark. The vaccine does not contain any live or inactivated virus.

How effective is the Novavax vaccine, and what are the side effects?

Clinical trial data showed the vaccine to be more than 90% effective at protecting against symptomatic disease and 100% effective against severe disease and death.

Side effects are similar to those experienced by the other COVID-19 vaccines, including arm soreness at the injection site, muscle pain, headaches and fatigue.

According to the CDC, severe allergic reactions to vaccines are rare but can happen. Extremely rare cases of heart inflammation (e.g., myocarditis and pericarditis) have been reported in people who received the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine. Importantly, the risk of developing heart inflammation from COVID-19 infection remains higher than the risk of developing these conditions from a COVID-19 vaccine, including Novavax.

Will Georgetown offer the Novavax vaccine?

At this time, the vaccine will only be available in local pharmacies and from your health care provider.

Information about Novavax availability can be found at vaccines.gov.

I did not get a COVID-19 vaccine due to an allergy to a component of the mRNA vaccine. Is the Novavax vaccine right for me?

If you have not received an mRNA (e.g., Moderna, Pfizer) or viral-vector (e.g., Johnson & Johnson) COVID-19 vaccine because of a known and documented allergy to one of the ingredients, Novavax may be an option for you. The availability of this new vaccine provides an option for members of our community who previously received a medical exemption because of concerns with the previously available vaccines but for whom the Novavax vaccine is not contraindicated.

I did not get a COVID-19 vaccine because fetal cells were used in the early development of previously available vaccines, which is in conflict with my religious beliefs. Is the Novavax vaccine right for me?

The Novavax vaccine does not contain any tissues from aborted fetal cells. Novavax stated that “no human fetal-derived cell lines or tissue” were used in the development, manufacture or production of its vaccine.

Please note that none of the previously available vaccines contain fetal cells, as is the case with the Novavax vaccine. However, some individuals were concerned about receiving an mRNA  (e.g., Moderna, Pfizer) or viral-vector (e.g., Johnson & Johnson) vaccine because laboratory-grown cell lines derived from fetal cells obtained several decades ago were used in the very early development stages of the vaccines (though not in the vaccines themselves).

I have been vaccinated but I have a compromised immune system and may not be fully protected. What should I do?

If you believe you are immunocompromised, please consult your physician, get any additional COVID-19 doses currently recommended, and take additional precautions, such as mask wearing and physical distancing, even in situations where these are not required. Please wear a properly-fitted, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95, KF94) whenever possible.

When you get an additional shot, please upload documentation of this dose via the GU360 mobile app or GU360 website.

If you are a student and think you require accommodations, please consult your campus disability services office (Academic Resource Center for the Main Campus, or Office of Disability Services for the Law Center). If you are a faculty or staff member, please consult the Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity and Affirmative Action.

What if I do not get vaccinated?

There are very limited exceptions to the vaccination requirement. Those exceptions are:

  • Students, faculty and staff who have received medical or religious accommodations under the process described in these FAQs.
  • Online students whose courses do not have any in-person instruction or activities during the semester.

Students who remain unvaccinated and do not qualify for one of those exceptions will be withdrawn from classes and placed on a leave of absence.
For employees who remain unvaccinated and do not qualify for an accommodation, on a case-by-case basis, the University may offer reassignment to an alternative position or the employee may take a period of unpaid leave or use accrued paid time off.

What if I need to take time off to get vaccinated or recover from any side effects?

All staff and AAP employees, including part-time and temporary employees, are provided 88 hours (equal to 11 full-time working days) of COVID-19 Paid Time Off (PTO), which is only to be used if an employee cannot work, either on campus or remotely, during their scheduled work hours because of the following reasons:

  • Vaccination Appointments: Up to 4 hours of COVID-19 Vaccination PTO per injection appointment, including primary vaccination dose(s) and booster(s), for the following individuals:
    • Employee’s appointment to receive a COVID-19 vaccination.
    • Employee’s minor child’s appointment to receive a COVID-19 vaccination (for the purposes of this policy, a “minor child” means a child under the age of 18 years who lives with an employee and for whom the employee permanently assumes and discharges parental responsibility, or a foster child under the age of 18 years).
  • Vaccination Recovery: Up to 16 hours of COVID-19 Vaccination PTO per vaccination appointment, available to be taken within the 2 days following a vaccination appointment, for the following individuals:
    • Employee’s own short-term side effects after receiving a COVID-19 vaccination.
    • Employee’s minor child’s short-term side effects after receiving a COVID-19 vaccination.

Employees may request to use COVID-19 Vaccination PTO by completing a time off request in GMS through the COVID-19 Vaccination PTO time off plan. Please give your manager as much advance notice as possible when requesting leave.

I am a student in an online program that includes no in-person presence. Do I need to be vaccinated?

No. If you are a student in an online course or program that does not require in-person presence, you do not need to be vaccinated, but we strongly urge you to get vaccinated to protect yourself and others.

Students enrolled in any online or hybrid courses that have an in-person component on campus or at an off-campus location used by Georgetown for course instruction (including but not limited to students enrolled in an online nursing program who will complete an Objective Clinical Intensive (OCI)) are required to comply with the University’s COVID-19 vaccination requirement, or to have an approved medical or religious exemption.

I am a student in a hybrid online/on-campus program. Do I need to be vaccinated?

Yes. Students enrolled in any online or hybrid courses that have an in-person component on campus or at an off-campus location used by Georgetown for course instruction (including but not limited to students enrolled in an online nursing program who will complete an Objective Clinical Intensive (OCI)) are required to comply with the University’s COVID-19 vaccination requirement, or to have an approved medical or religious exemption. Please submit your vaccination documentation or apply for a medical or religious exemption from the COVID-19 vaccination requirement.

I am a visiting student attending Georgetown University through the Consortium of Universities in the Washington Metropolitan Area. Do I need to be vaccinated?

Yes. If you are a student enrolled in a course or program at Georgetown that requires in-person presence, you will need to comply with the University’s COVID-19 vaccination requirement.

When should I get a vaccine dose after a breakthrough infection?

We currently do not have data on the immunity induced by breakthrough infections, and there is no one answer as to “when” is the best time.

If you have underlying medical issues or have a household member who is more vulnerable, you should get the additional dose sooner rather than later. You may get a shot as soon as you are done with isolation. If you are otherwise healthy or low-risk, you can wait for several weeks, but best not to wait for more than 4 weeks.

I live outside the United States and have received a COVID-19 vaccine that is not authorized by the FDA or WHO. What should I do? Will I need to be re-vaccinated?

If you have received a COVID-19 vaccine that is not currently authorized by the FDA or the WHO, you will receive a deadline extension and will need to be re-vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine upon arrival on campus. Please email hoyavaxa@georgetown.edu for guidance on scheduling an appointment and receiving a deadline extension, and submit proof of your prior vaccination through the GU360 mobile app or GU360 website.

You will be able to participate in in-person activities and classes on campus while you are receiving your vaccination, but you will need to participate in enhanced testing protocols until you have submitted documentation showing that you are fully vaccinated. We recommend you consider wearing a mask in crowded indoors settings.

I won’t be fully vaccinated when I arrive on campus because COVID-19 vaccines are not available or widely available in my country, or to my age group. Will I have to study remotely and be unable to participate in campus activities until I am up to date? 

Please email hoyavaxa@georgetown.edu for guidance on scheduling an appointment and receiving a deadline extension. You will be able to participate in in-person activities and classes while you are in the process of becoming up to date on your vaccination, but you will need to participate in enhanced testing protocols until you have submitted documentation showing that you are up to date.

I had COVID-19 and have not received the entire recommended series (e.g., 3 mRNA doses, or one Johnson & Johnson dose plus one additional shot) because my doctor said that was enough. Will I be considered up to date?

This practice is not consistent with CDC guidelines, which recommend that everyone, regardless of prior infection status, become up to date on vaccination. If you are seeking an exemption from the requirement that you receive any required additional doses, please submit a medical exemption request through Student Health (for students) and IDEAA (for faculty and staff)

Individuals who are in the process of becoming up to date on their vaccination will need to request a deadline extension by emailing hoyavaxa@georgetown.edu to coordinate their vaccination plan.

I need to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, but I am also due for some other vaccines. Will I be able to receive them at the same time?

Based on CDC guidance, COVID-19 vaccines may be co-administered with other vaccines without regard to timing. This includes simultaneous administration of COVID-19 and other vaccines on the same day, as well as co-administration within 14 days.

I am partially vaccinated against COVID-19 but had a breakthrough case of COVID-19 and received monoclonal antibody treatment. When should I get an additional dose?

There is no longer a need to wait for 90 days after your monoclonal antibody treatment to receive a COVID-19 shot; you may receive it as soon as you are done with isolation. 

As someone with a compromised immune system, are there preventive treatment options against COVID-19?

A new treatment with certain monoclonal antibodies has been shown to help prevent COVID-19 in individuals who are moderately or severely immunocompromised. This treatment is not a substitute for vaccination. Please talk to your doctor about whether you are eligible for pre-exposure treatment with monoclonal antibodies.

Should University community members get a seasonal influenza vaccination?

Georgetown strongly encourages University community members to get the seasonal influenza vaccine as soon as possible.

Will I know who is and who is not vaccinated?

No, in order to protect personal privacy, you will not know who has or has not been vaccinated, unless the individual discloses that information to you directly. Please do not assume that because someone is wearing a mask on campus that they are not up to date on their vaccination. Individuals may choose to wear a mask when it is not required for various reasons (e.g., they want to enhance their personal protection against being infected, have a compromised immune system, have a family member with a compromised immune system, or have a family member who cannot be vaccinated).

How will Georgetown protect my privacy?

Georgetown will continue to comply with all applicable privacy, confidentiality and public health laws relating to collection and maintenance of health-related records. The University recognizes the importance of protecting private health information and will protect faculty, student, staff and visitor privacy by limiting what sensitive information is collected, who has access to it, how it is used and how long it is retained to the extent possible while protecting public health.

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Testing Anchor

Testing

Who is required to be tested for COVID-19?

All University community members, regardless of vaccination status, need to adhere to the COVID-19 Testing Protocols.

After their return-to-campus test, can students, faculty and staff continue to get tested on campus, even when it’s not required?

Yes. All students, faculty, and staff may schedule an on-campus test through the One Medical app at any time, at no charge to them. We strongly urge anyone with symptoms, even the most minor ones, to report their symptoms in the GU360 app and get tested.

How does the COVID-19 testing work?

Please visit Georgetown’s COVID-19 Testing Protocol web page for more information.

If I get a COVID-19 test at home, or through my healthcare provider or at an off-campus testing facility, does that count?

Yes, you may choose to schedule a PCR test with a third-party healthcare provider, if the testing occurs within the time frame specified in the University’s COVID-19 Testing Protocol. Payment for third-party testing is your responsibility.

It is also your responsibility to report your test results to Georgetown in a timely manner. You may submit your test result through the COVID-19 Test Result Submission Form.

If you are taking an at-home antigen test please take a photo with your phone of the result and submit your test result through the COVID-19 Test Result Submission Form.

You may order free Antigen testing kits via www.covidtests.gov/. We recommend having some at home in case you become symptomatic and need to get tested.

Will students, faculty, and staff be charged for COVID-19 testing?

Georgetown will provide free COVID-19 PCR tests, administered by One Medical, to students, faculty, and staff. We will also provide antigen testing kits in certain situations free of charge to students or employees. Georgetown will not cover testing conducted at other facilities, such as your primary care provider or at-home testing kits purchased in local pharmacies. Family members of live-in Georgetown faculty and staff members who reside with them on campus or who live in Georgetown-owned properties are eligible to register with One Medical to receive free testing.

What is wastewater testing?

Wastewater testing is an efficient, science-based method for detecting COVID-19 levels in our community. People who are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 shed viral material through their feces, even before they have symptoms (which for many people is the first trigger to test), so wastewater testing can serve as an early warning signal of rising levels and allow us to more rapidly take public health measures in case of an outbreak. Another benefit is that it is an unobtrusive method of population-health level testing. Universities and state and local governments are expanding this capability for monitoring throughout the United States.

Wastewater testing will replace randomized asymptomatic testing on campus. Community members will not be randomly selected to test each week. However, individuals who are exempt from vaccination for religious or medical reasons, or who received the primary vaccination series and are booster-eligible but have received an exemption or deadline extension from the booster shot requirement, must get tested once per week. Free COVID-19 testing (PCR and antigen) continues to be available on demand on campus.

Where are we testing wastewater on campus?

We are conducting wastewater testing at approximately two dozen locations on our three campuses, which have been selected to represent residence halls and other heavily used buildings. This will allow us to monitor transmission across the University and in specific locations on campus.

What will the University do if wastewater testing indicates that viral levels are high?

Viral levels will be sampled twice weekly. If there are increasing or persistent medium or high levels across the University or in specific locations, the University may implement temporary measures, such as enhanced testing or masking, which may be tailored to specific populations on campus. We will provide updates to Georgetown community members as needed.

Will Georgetown only test for COVID-19, or will you test for other diseases?

At this time we are only testing the wastewater for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. In the future, we may consider expanding testing to other diseases as warranted by public health conditions (e.g., polio, flu). Any changes will be announced in advance to the Georgetown community.

What is One Medical?

Georgetown has partnered with One Medical, a leading primary care provider network, to provide COVID-19 testing at no charge to our University community members.

Who needs to use the One Medical app?

Students, faculty and staff who will be on any university-owned, managed, or controlled properties must follow Georgetown’s COVID-19 Testing Protocol, including testing scheduled via the One Medical app. Georgetown will email instructions about signing up for the mobile app to students, faculty, and staff who are required to use it.

Why am I being asked for a registration code or to pay a registration fee during One Medical registration?

The University is working with One Medical, a leading primary care provider network, to provide on-campus COVID-19 testing at no charge to eligible community members. 

Every active Georgetown community member with a net ID is eligible for COVID-19 testing through One Medical. At the time of registration, One Medical matches your NetID email address to a list of community members provided by Georgetown.

If you are prompted to apply a code or pay a registration fee, this is a sign that One Medical has not been able to match you to the list of community members for one of the following reasons:

  • You are not using your NetID email address. FirstName.LastName@georgetown.edu and personal email addresses are NOT provided to One Medical.
  • You are not using the sponsored membership link. You must use a sponsored membership link so One Medical knows to look for your NetID email address and route you to the Georgetown registration process.
  • You have recently been hired by Georgetown or have recently enrolled as a student. Georgetown provides a new list of approved community members to One Medical every evening. When you enroll as a student, you will be added to the list of approved community members provided to One Medical. When you are hired by Georgetown, your manager and campus leadership will alert HR that you will be on campus and you will be added to the list of approved community members provided to One Medical. If your approval takes place after that day’s data transfer, you will be added to the next day’s list and appear the following day.

If you are eligible for a free One Medical membership but you continue to run into registration issues, please contact One Medical at 1-888-ONEMED1 (1-888-663-6331) or hello@onemedical.com.

How do I register for a One Medical account? 

Using the browser on your computer or mobile phone, you can follow the direct link provided by Georgetown to the registration page for One Medical. You will then enter your NetID Georgetown email address and follow the prompts to complete the registration process. Please note that, if you use a browser to register, One Medical will use cookies and other tracking technologies, as described in the One Medical Privacy Policy.

More detailed instructions are available for browser-based registration.

How do I get the One Medical app?

You can download the free One Medical app by going to either the Apple App Store (iOS) or Google Play (Android).

Will One Medical share my COVID-19 test results with Georgetown? 

When you register as a One Medical member, you will need to submit a consent form authorizing One Medical to release COVID-19 test results to Georgetown. Please indicate that “Georgetown University” is the party to receive the information covered under the authorization.

What does One Medical do with my COVID-19 test results?

Once you submit the consent form, your COVID-19 test results and testing administration information (e.g., dates of testing) will only be shared between One Medical and Georgetown, as authorized by you. Your individual information may also be shared by One Medical or Georgetown with testing laboratories, as necessary to perform COVID-19 testing, and with health authorities, as required by law.

Georgetown will continue to comply with all applicable privacy, confidentiality, and public health laws relating to collection and maintenance of testing and other health-related records. The University recognizes the importance of protecting private health information and will protect faculty, student, and staff privacy by limiting what sensitive information is collected, who has access to it, how it is used, and how long it is retained to the extent possible while protecting public health.

Can I use One Medical on my computer/laptop instead of my mobile phone?

You can book testing appointments and view provider messages on your computer or laptop as well as through the mobile app. Please note that, if you use a browser, One Medical will use cookies and other tracking technologies, as described in the One Medical Privacy Policy.

Who can I contact with questions/assistance about One Medical?

If you have any questions or concerns about the testing process or the One Medical app, please contact One Medical at 1-888-ONEMED1 (1-888-663-6331) or hello@onemedical.com.

What if the results or instructions from One Medical are different from the instructions I am getting from the University?

There may be some circumstances where results or instructions you get from One Medical may be different from those you get from Georgetown. Should such a situation arise, please get in touch with a Care Navigator who will guide you though next steps. In general, you are expected to follow public health instructions provided by the Georgetown Public Health team, even if they differ from those provided by One Medical.

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Masks Anchor

Masks

Am I required to wear a mask while on campus?

Wearing a mask is optional in University-owned or operated buildings, including academic buildings, research laboratories, libraries, offices, dining facilities, residential buildings and fitness centers, with limited exceptions, including:

  • Individuals must wear a mask in University health care facilities (e.g., Student Health Center, CAPS, One Medical testing sites, flu vaccination clinics).
  • Individuals must wear a mask while on university-sponsored public transportation (e.g., GUTS buses, shuttles, vans).
  • Individuals must wear a mask in Early Childhood Education facilities (i.e., Hoya Kids Learning Center and Georgetown Law Early Learning Center).
  • Individuals in, or recently released from, quarantine or isolation must wear a mask for the full 10 days from the date of exposure or infection, consistent with DC Health guidance and CDC guidance.
  • Individuals with exemptions or accommodation plans that include enhanced public health measures should continue to abide by those measures, as currently in place.

Everyone has the right to wear a mask whenever and wherever they wish on our campuses.

Should I wear a mask in indoor public places off campus?

As you consider your personal risk level and of those around you, you should consider wearing a mask in indoor public places, especially in busy or crowded settings, outside of our campuses. Wearing a properly-fitting, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95) provides the wearer with substantial protection from infection, even when around others not wearing masks.

Will the University provide face masks?

Free high-quality masks continue to be available at entrances to most campus buildings. Employees may also receive masks from their departments.

Does a mask distribution stand on campus need to be restocked?

If you see empty or near-empty mask supplies at building entrances on the Main and Medical Center campuses, please contact Facilities Work Management at 202-687-3432 or submit a ticket, and the stand will be replenished. At the Law Center, please contact Facilities Management at 202-662-9330 or email lawfacilitiesmgmt@georgetown.edu for assistance.

Can I reuse a high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95, KF94)?

Yes, in general, a high-quality mask can be used for a total of approximately five days (i.e., 40 hours). We recommend resting it for 48 hours between uses in a paper or mesh bag and rotating it with other high-quality masks. It should be replaced sooner if it becomes wet, soiled or damaged (e.g., ear loops or nose strip become loose so that there are gaps between the mask and face).

How should I safely dispose of a high-quality (e.g., N95, KN95 or KF94) or surgical-style mask? 

You should dispose of your mask in a trash can when you are finished using it, and wash your hands.

May I ask others around me to put on a mask during our interaction (class, meeting, event)?

Anyone may request – but not require – that those around them or interacting with them wear a mask. 

If somebody requests that you wear a mask around them, you cannot ask them why, but please be considerate and try to honor their request for the short time you may be around them. 

Am I still protected if I am the only one wearing a mask in my classroom/office?

Wearing a mask offers protection to the individual wearer, even if others around are unmasked.

This protection from being infected is enhanced depending on the type of mask you wear (its ‘filtration rate’), how well-fitted it is, the setting you are in, the duration of the interaction, and the nature of the activity.

In the context of low community transmission, being up to date on vaccination, and wearing the highest-grade mask available (e.g., N95, KN95), protects the wearer significantly.

As you plan your activities and decide whether or in what situations to wear a mask, consider the following:

  • Your personal risk (e.g., immunocompromised status, high-risk medical conditions),
  • The type of mask you can wear (e.g., N95, surgical),
  • The length of time you are spending with unmasked people,
  •  The type of activity (e.g., minimal interactions, singing, yelling),
  • The setting (e.g., indoors, ventilation status, proximity and density)
  • The anticipated number of people you will be interacting with and your tasks/responsibilities (e.g., dining, greeting or hosting).  

You can find more information about the use and care of masks on the CDC website. The CDC also provides instructions for wearing a N95.

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Symptom Monitoring

What is the COVID-19 symptom check-in survey? Why am I required to report on my health?

Georgetown uses information from this survey to provide health, quarantine and testing guidance to anyone with symptoms or who may have had an exposure to COVID-19.

Community members are expected to stay home or in their on-campus residence if they have any symptoms, call the Student Health Center (if a student) or their health care provider, schedule a COVID-19 test, and self-quarantine until cleared by their health care provider or after a consultation with the Care Navigator team.

I’m not feeling well, but I think it’s just allergies. What should I do?

Please stay home if you have any symptoms consistent with COVID-19. Even though many people experience seasonal allergies, if you aren’t feeling well, please don’t assume it’s because of allergies. Please report your symptoms to the Public Health team by completing the COVID-19 Symptom Check-In survey, and get tested.

 

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Events and Visitors

Are in-person events allowed on campus?

Indoor events and meetings have resumed on campus, including with visitors, provided that event organizers, meeting hosts and visitors follow the University’s visitor vaccination requirement and process. The University may limit capacity in certain large indoor venues at any time (e.g., Gaston Hall, McDonough Arena). Please visit the University’s Event and Visitor Guidelines page for more information.

Are visitors allowed on campus?

Yes. To protect the health and safety of the Georgetown community, visitors to University-owned or operated buildings in the United States must have received a a primary series and, when eligible, an additional dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, or attest to having a medical or religious exemption.

Visitors will need to follow the University’s protocol for verifying their vaccination status and complete a health attestation on the morning of their visit to attest that they are symptom-free. 

Please visit the Event and Visitor Guidelines page for more information about the visitor registration process, public health guidance for events, and reserving event space on our campuses.

What should I do if I have not received information from my host ahead of my visit to campus?

Please contact your host and ask them to send you an event/meeting-specific link to be used for your visit to campus.

How soon before my visit to campus can I complete this process?

You will be able to submit your vaccination documentation or attest to having a medical/religious exemption as soon as your campus host provides you with the link for your event/meeting. We encourage all visitors to complete this process as soon as possible once you receive a link from your host. You will not be able to complete the final step in the process (health symptom attestation, and an upload of a negative PCR test if you indicate an exemption) until the morning of your visit to campus.

Do I need to bring my vaccine documentation with me when visiting campus?

As long as you have successfully completed the process outlined in the Event and Visitor Guidelines and receive an email confirming you are approved to visit campus, you do not need to carry your vaccination documentation with you. If you are unable to upload your vaccination documentation in advance of your visit, you will need to bring vaccination documentation to campus. It is possible that other venues in the District of Columbia may ask to see proof of vaccination, so it is always good to carry it with you when traveling.

What should I do if I am hosting a multi-day event (i.e., two or more consecutive days) on campus with visitors?

Students, faculty or staff hosting a multi-day event in a University-owned or operated building may choose to create one event/meeting record for their event or separate event/meeting records for each session of their multi-day event. Visitors only need to submit a health attestation form (and, if required, negative PCR test results) once for a multi-day event. However, hosts should instruct visitors that they should stay home, not attend the rest of the event and notify their host if they develop symptoms at any time during a multi-day event.

Can a visitor register for an event/meeting on the day of the event/meeting?

While we strongly encourage hosts to make sure visitors register for their event/meeting prior to their visit, hosts may share this same-day visitor registration form with visitors who are not able to submit their vaccination documentation in advance. To assist with completing the registration form, hosts should instruct their visitors on which campus location and host name to enter for their event or meeting. Visitors will need to provide their contact information, submit their vaccination documentation or attest to having a medical or religious exemption or being under the age of 12, and complete a health attestation. If the visitor attests to having an exemption or is under the age of 12, they will need to upload a negative PCR test result taken within the last 48 hours in order to complete the visitor registration process.

What should I do if I have not been vaccinated and cannot attest to a medical or religious exemption for not receiving a COVID-19 vaccine?

Please discuss with your host alternative ways to complete your visit. This may include doing your visit via Zoom or delaying to a future point in time.

Who should I contact if I have any questions?

Please first contact your event host or campus point of contact. If you have technical questions about how to complete the visitor vaccination process, please contact visitors@georgetown.edu.

I would like to reserve space in a tent, how do I do that?

To reserve a tent on the Main Campus, please visit eventmanagement.georgetown.edu and click on the link for the guide to reserving tents. Direct any questions to eventmanagement@georgetown.edu. At the Law Center, please complete this form (for room selection choose “outside space”); email lawscheduling@georgetown.edu with any questions.

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Data and Privacy Anchor

Data and Privacy

What does One Medical do with my personal data?

One Medical maintains your personally identifiable information in accordance with its Privacy Policy. It maintains your Protected Health Information (as defined by HIPAA) in accordance with its HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices. Your Protected Health Information will only be shared by One Medical: with Georgetown with your express authorization; as needed to provide health care services to you (e.g. with testing laboratories) with your express authorization; or as otherwise permitted by law (e.g. reporting of positive test results to public health officials).

What information about me does One Medical share with Georgetown?

When signing up for the app, individuals must sign the consent form, which authorizes One Medical to release COVID-19 test results to Georgetown. (Please indicate that “Georgetown University” is the party to receive the information covered under the consent.) Consistent with your authorization, information shared by One Medical with Georgetown will include: 

  • your name
  • your date of birth
  • testing administration information and date of testing, and 
  • testing results.

What COVID-19 testing information is Georgetown required to report?

Under federal, state, and local law, Georgetown University is required to report your test results along with certain demographic information about you (age, race, ethnicity, sex) as Georgetown performs COVID-19 testing through its own laboratory. This information is reported by Georgetown to the appropriate local health authorities, such as DC Health, the Virginia Department of Health and the Maryland Department of Health, which are then responsible for reporting this information, in a way that doesn’t identify you individually, to the federal government. As federal and local health authorities maintain and use this information about you, they are required to maintain your privacy, except as permitted by law. Individual-level data is necessary for outbreak detection, rapid implementation of emergency measures, and identification of trends that require a strategic public health response.

What information would be reported to law enforcement officials or public health authorities by One Medical to “Protect public health and safety” or “Prevent or control disease, injury, or disability”? What would be reported in the event that an individual tested positive for COVID-19? 

Where One Medical has a legal obligation to report positive disease status to agencies or public officials, it would do so by reporting, as required to comply with the law. If individuals test positive for COVID-19, One Medical reports to public health agencies and officials, as required.

Does One Medical share my health information as it participates in health information exchanges?

One Medical would share your health information with HIEs only if you affirmatively opt in to such sharing.

For what purposes does One Medical share de-identified information? What steps are taken by One Medical to prevent re-identification of de-identified information?

One Medical may share de-identified information with partners or service providers for service provision, data analysis and reporting in connection with its business operations, for quality and value assessments, for service improvement, etc. It may share aggregated information, a type of de-identified information, externally for reporting purposes.

One Medical has safeguards around minimum population size for sharing de-identified and aggregated health information to protect against possible re-identification.

One Medical’s de-identification protocols and processes are compliant with the HIPAA requirements for de-identification (e.g., the Safe Harbor Rule or the Expert Determination Rule).

Does One Medical sell my information?

No. One Medical does not sell its patients’ information.

How can I opt out of arbitration as the means for resolving any dispute with One Medical? 

You may opt out of the arbitration clause in One Medical’s “Membership Terms of Service” (Section 12. Dispute Resolution) by sending an email, within 30 days of accepting the terms of service, indicating that you wish to opt-out of arbitration to terms@onemedical.com. The email must include your name and date of birth. Your opt-out request will be automatically logged by One Medical.

How can I control what functions (e.g., camera, audio, location, etc.) are enabled through the One Medical app?

The One Medical app allows you to control whether some functions that affect your privacy are enabled or disabled. It is your choice whether to enable the camera, microphone and location access. They are not required, but you may choose to use them for other app functionalities or One Medical services, such as Video Chat. 

One Medical Access to Microphone and Camera

iOS

(Note: Your device’s camera and microphone are disabled by default.)

  1. Tap Settings.
  2. Locate the One Medical app.
  3. Check the sliders for Microphone and Camera to ensure that they are disabled.
Android

(Note: Your device’s camera and microphone are disabled by default.)

    1. Tap Settings on your phone and then select Apps.
    2. Tap All to display a full list of your apps.
  • Scroll down to find the One Medical app and then tap on its listing.
  1. Tap Permissions.
  2. Make sure the sliders next to Camera and Microphone are moved so that they are disabled.

Setting One Medical App Access to Your Location

Setting Location Access from the One Medical App (iOS)
  1. In the One Medical app, tap the Locations icon at the bottom right hand side of your screen. The first time you do this, you will see the following message:A screenshot of a pop-up message on a phone that reads
  2. Tap the desired option.
Setting Location Access from Your Phone (iOS)
  1. Tap Settings.
  2. In the ‘Settings’ screen, tap Privacy.
  3. Tap on Location Services.
  4. Tap on One Medical.
  5. Tap on the desired option (Never, Ask Next Time, or While Using the App).
Setting Location Access from the One Medical App (Android)
  1. In the One Medical app, tap on Locations. The first time you do this, you will see the following message:A screenshot of a pop-up message on a phone that says
  2. Tap Allow or Deny.
  3. If you selected Deny, you will see the following message the next time you access Locations:A pop-up text box that says
  4. Tap OK.
  5. In the pop-up, tap Allow or Deny. (Note: If you tap Allow, you can always go back and disable location access in Settings.)
Set Location Access from Your Phone (Android)
  1. Tap Settings.
  2. Tap Apps.
  3. Scroll to locate the One Medical app, and then tap on its listing.
  4. In the next screen, tap on Permissions.
  5. For Location, tap the slider so that it’s disabled.
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Quarantine and Isolation Anchor

Quarantine and Isolation

What is the procedure for students isolating in their campus residence after a positive COVID-19 test?

Students isolating in their campus residences will need to:

  • Stay in their room, and not leave except to use the restroom, get tested, get medical care or pick up their meals.
  • Wear a properly-fitting, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95, KF94) when around other individuals while completing the activities outlined above or while in their shared residence.

Students may visit Georgetown’s Isolation Support site for more information and resources.

My roommate is isolating in our campus residence. What should I do?

We recommend that students:

  • Wear a properly-fitting, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95) when around their roommates in their residences.
  • Stay in their own bedrooms with their doors closed, if possible, when in their campus residence.
  • Avoid entering the bathroom when others are present, if possible.
  • Disinfect the bathroom and kitchen as often as possible.
  • Eat in separate rooms, if possible, or in the outdoor tents on campus.
  • Avoid sharing personal items.

Who will be required to self-quarantine or isolate?

Quarantine is required for all students, faculty and staff as directed by Georgetown or by the DC Department of Health or relevant state or local public health authorities, based on vaccination status, exposure to COVID-19 or travel circumstances.

Isolation is required for all individuals who have a confirmed positive COVID-19 test result or are otherwise diagnosed with COVID-19 by a health professional even if your test result is negative.

Visit the Quarantine and Isolation page for Georgetown’s policies and procedures for COVID-19 quarantine and isolation.

I am up to date on my COVID-19 vaccination, have no symptoms, but tested positive on a required test. Do I still have to go into isolation?

Students, faculty and staff who receive a positive PCR test, even if asymptomatic, must follow Georgetown’s isolation protocol.

I tested positive by PCR, got re-tested and received a negative subsequent test. Was the first test a false positive? Must I continue to isolate?

It is unlikely that your first test was a false positive. PCR tests are considered the gold standard of diagnostic COVID-19 tests, and the PCR test we use is very sensitive. When test results come back “positive,” this means that the test has detected genetic material from the virus that causes COVID-19, since the test is very specific to this particular virus.

Individuals may receive different test results for a variety of reasons, including taking different types of COVID-19 tests (e.g., PCR, antigen) and different methods of collection (i.e., nasal swab versus saliva test, or self-collection versus collection by a healthcare provider). Receiving different PCR test results on consecutive days can happen for different reasons and usually has to do with where you are in the infection cycle and your vaccination status. PCR tests’ accuracy often depends on when someone is tested—early in the infection cycle or later in the infection cycle, the viral particles may be lower or even undetected.

Anyone who receives a positive PCR test, even if asymptomatic, even if up to date on vaccination, and even if they receive a subsequent negative test, must complete isolation in accordance with University and DC Health guidelines.

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Additional Safety Measures Anchor

Additional Safety Measures

I have COVID-19. What treatment options are available?

There are new oral antiviral treatments for COVID-19 for individuals at high risk for complications. You may also qualify for treatment with certain monoclonal antibodies by infusion. If you are infected, please talk to your doctor about available treatments and your eligibility.

There are also many COVID-19 “Test to Treat” (T2T) locations in the DC region that offer clinical evaluations, testing, and antivirals (as appropriate) on site. You may go directly to these sites to get tested, to be evaluated by a clinician, and to have a prescription dispensed by a pharmacist. For the medication to be effective, you must take it within five days of when you first developed symptoms.

If you choose to get tested at one of these sites, please report your test results to Georgetown by submitting the COVID-19 Test Result Submission Form.

What happens if there is a positive case in a course I am teaching or enrolled in?

If you are notified of a positive case in a course you are teaching or enrolled in, please follow the guidance below regarding potential exposure.

What should I do if I’ve been exposed, or potentially exposed, to someone with COVID-19?

In line with CDC guidance, please take the following actions:

  • Wear a mask around others for ten days after the potential exposure. 
  • Get tested five days after your most recent exposure.
  • Stay home and get tested if you develop symptoms. Please report your symptoms to the Public Health team by completing the COVID-19 Symptom Check-In survey. If you receive a positive test result from a third-party provider (i.e., not One Medical) or at-home antigen test, please report your result through the COVID-19 Test Result Submission form.

I have unvaccinated or vulnerable family or household members. How can I protect them? 

If you consistently adhere to public health prevention measures, the risk of you transmitting the virus is low.

General guidance for protecting unvaccinated or vulnerable family members includes:

  1. Get vaccinated yourself, and become up to date on your vaccination as soon as you are eligible.
  2. Ensure everyone else in the household who can get vaccinated (5 years old and above), does and has received all doses they are eligible for.
  3. Wear a properly fitting, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95, KF94) whenever you are around others indoors or in crowded outdoor settings. 
  4. If you want to eat or drink (and thus take the mask off), limit it to a setting/location where you can be alone or outside.
  5. If you have symptoms, wear a mask around others, including family members, and get tested. You can get tested on campus, at no cost to you. You should quarantine and avoid contact with your vulnerable household member, if possible.
  6. Even without symptoms, if you are concerned, get tested frequently. You can get tested on campus as often as you wish, at no cost to you.
  7. Practice all other prevention measures consistently (e.g., hand washing, avoiding crowded settings, social distancing, etc.)
  8. Modify your activities to participate only in those with the lowest risk (avoid gyms, indoor restaurants, etc.).

What happens if there is significant community transmission of COVID-19?

Georgetown’s public health protocols are subject to change based on campus, local, and national public health conditions and new guidance from local and federal authorities. Any updates will be communicated to the University community and will be posted on Georgetown’s COVID-19 Resource Center website.

Georgetown will monitor for cases of COVID-19 among the University community. Increased numbers and rates of cases in the University community could trigger changes in University operations to help address the rise in cases, including reinstating an indoor mask requirement, using different education modalities and implementing other enhanced mitigation activities.

Should I be concerned about attending large social events or traveling?

Please consider community transmission and your own personal circumstances when making decisions about whether, and how, to attend large social events or travel. You may consider getting tested before and after attending events or traveling, and wearing a properly-fitting, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95) while around others in crowded settings.

What factors should I consider when making such decisions for myself and others?

As you plan your activities and assess your risk, consider the following:

  • Your personal risk (e.g., immunocompromised status, high-risk medical conditions),
  • Your vaccination status (you’re most protected when up to date with your vaccination),
  • The type of mask you can wear (e.g., N95, surgical),
  • The length of time you are spending with unmasked people, or in an area of high transmission,
  • The type of activity (e.g., minimal interactions, singing, yelling),
  • The setting (e.g., indoors, ventilation status, proximity to others and density),
  • The anticipated number of people you will be interacting with and your tasks/responsibilities (e.g., dining, greeting or hosting).

How is Georgetown notifying community members of positive COVID-19 cases?

Each Monday, the University updates the COVID-19 Dashboard and notifies the community of the prior week’s testing results of positive cases of individuals affiliated with the university through a public health alert. To receive the public health alert, subscribe to Daily COVID-19 Updates.

What is the university doing to improve air systems across campus?

Planning & Facilities Management is working to minimize the spread of viruses through the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, among other measures. Our ongoing HVAC assessment and enhancement program will ensure that all classrooms and study spaces meet CDC COVID-19 guidance and American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standards for mitigation of virus transmission.

Working with a team of professional engineers and contractors, University personnel are evaluating, upgrading and monitoring the performance of the ventilation systems that provide temperature control and ventilation air that flushes contaminants from the classrooms, study rooms and common spaces within the University buildings. The work of this team ensured the University is: 

  1. Identifying existing equipment condition and working to upgrade equipment operation and air filtration to meet the most current standards for space conditioning and contaminant control with each building;
  2. Improving air filtration in all occupied buildings;
  3. Working with the operation teams to improve and sustain the HVAC systems in every building across our Main, Med, and Law campuses;
  4. Developing a monitoring and maintenance strategy to confirm continuing operation of building systems in compliance with current good engineering practices; and,
  5. Establishing, based on current operating conditions in each building and each approved space, a maximum safe occupancy for that space that complies with the University program for re-occupying buildings.

Upgrades to the building ventilation systems include MERV-13 air filtration for occupied spaces, installation of ultraviolet decontamination systems and building air flushing strategies to reduce airborne transmission.

Should I be concerned about a higher risk of infection if I cannot open the windows or do not have windows in my classroom?

No, you should not. Using the HVAC systems to provide proper ventilation and filtration is a much more reliable method for minimizing the spread of airborne diseases, while ensuring a comfortable environment for occupants.

Reliance on open windows to provide adequate ventilation within a space is not practical given the Washington, DC climate. Opening windows during non-ideal weather conditions can lead to a loss of temperature and/or humidity control within the space, which can have a negative effect on overall indoor air quality and occupant comfort. Using the HVAC systems to provide proper ventilation and filtration is a much more reliable method for minimizing the spread of airborne diseases, while ensuring a comfortable environment for occupants.

Can COVID-19 be transmitted through the HVAC systems?

Per CDC COVID-19 guidance, the risk of spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 through HVAC systems is thought to be relatively low, however, the exact risk is not well-known at this time. The CDC recommends the use of a layered strategy to reduce exposure, which includes increased filtration, adequate ventilation, the use of masks and proper hand hygiene.

What factors does Georgetown University consider when making decisions about its COVID-19 policies?

Georgetown University takes many factors into consideration before any COVID-19 policies are made or changed. Our Public Health team regularly monitors multiple sources of data that inform any recommendations. These data sources include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance,
  • DC Department of Health guidance,
  • Local government mandates and school closures,
  • Medical literature and scientific publications,
  • Community transmission in the DC area,
  • University test positivity rate,
  • Parameters related to the University’s status as a “congregate setting,” where transmissibility is enhanced due to the nature of congregate living,
  • Vaccination status/efficacy (i.e., rates of vaccinations in the community and scientific data about the vaccines’ efficacy and/or waning immunity),
  • Variant characteristics (e.g., transmissibility, infectiousness, and disease characteristics of new variants),
  • Behaviors associated with positive cases determined through contact tracing (e.g., social gatherings, non-masked situations, travel, and frequently visited sites), and
  • At-risk groups (e.g., the number of unvaccinated individuals, older community members, and medically vulnerable community members).
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Operations Anchor

Operations

What factors does Georgetown consider when making decisions about its public health guidelines?

We take many factors into account before making or changing any public health guidelines. We regularly monitor multiple sources of data, including, but not limited to, CDC and DC Health guidance and statistics, community transmission in the DC region, and the University’s test positivity rate, rate of increase in cases, and isolation data.

Has the University received funding under any federal COVID relief legislation?

Yes – please visit the University’s CARES Act, CRRSAA and ARP overview pages for more information.

How can I help community members affected by COVID-19?

There are two easy ways to make a gift to support the COVID-19 Response and Resilience Fund.

Make your gift online at give.georgetown.edu. On this page you will find the option to give to either the COVID-19 Response and Resilience Fund or to student financial aid.

Make your gift by mailing a check to the address below and include “COVID-19 Response and Resilience Fund” in the Memo field of your check:

Georgetown University

Office of Gift Administration

Department 0734

Washington, DC 20073-0734

Please visit our How to Help page for more information about how to support members of the Georgetown community affected by COVID-19.

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Testing for Children of Faculty and Staff Anchor

Testing for Children of Faculty and Staff

Can my children get tested through One Medical on campus?

Georgetown University provides PCR testing to children under age 5 of full-time, benefits eligible employees through our partnership with One Medical. Please visit the COVID-19 Testing for Children of Employees page for more information.

Is testing of children under age 5 part of Georgetown’s public health protocols?

No, it is not. Opening up our testing sites to children under age 5 of our full-time, benefits eligible employees is intended to provide support to parents or guardians of young children.

Will Georgetown’s Care Navigation team receive information about my child’s test results?

No, the Care Navigation team will not be alerted or be able to provide support for test results of children under age 5. We advise that any questions parents or guardians may have be directed to the child’s pediatrician.

Will Georgetown provide these results to my child’s school and/or daycare provider? Will these results be provided to our local health authority?

Georgetown will not provide these results to your child’s school and/or daycare provider, or healthcare provider. You should access your child’s results through the One Medical app and provide these results directly to any school, daycare, or other organization or provider who may request them. Georgetown is required by law to report, through its testing laboratory, test results to federal, state, and local health authorities.  

If I test positive for COVID, am I required to test my young child at Georgetown? If I do not, do I need to report my child’s results to Georgetown?

No. Georgetown offers testing of children under age 5 as an additional support service for our full-time, benefits eligible employees. This testing is not required, nor is it part of Georgetown’s layered public health framework. This service merely provides another option for parents or guardians to access testing for young children. However, if any family member who you live with tests positive, you should report this exposure in the COVID-19 Symptom Check-In survey via the GU360 mobile app or website. 

May I bring all of my children, including those who are above age 5, to Georgetown for testing?

No. Unfortunately, the University does not have the capacity to expand this support service offering to other family members of our employees. 

My child is currently 4 years old, but will turn 5 very shortly. Will they remain eligible for testing through Georgetown once they are 5 years old?

No, unfortunately once a child turns 5 they will no longer be able to be tested through the University.

How will Georgetown and One Medical verify that my child is eligible for testing?

Georgetown will provide One Medical a list of all eligible dependents, under the age of 5, on a weekly basis. This list will be built based on dependents that employees have registered in GMS. When parents/guardians arrive with children for testing, One Medical will verify before testing that the child is eligible to be tested before proceeding.

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