View of stained glass with the Georgetown University seal

Magazine: Georgetown First Worldwide for Graduate International Affairs Study

A photo of a globe depicting North America. "We are both proud and flattered that Georgetown University again ranks high among the schools to study international affairs,” says James Reardon-Anderson, School of Foreign Service interim dean, of Foreign Policy magazine's high rankings for the school's programs.

January 26, 2015 Foreign Policy magazine has once again ranked Georgetown No. 1 in the world for graduate study and No. 4 for undergraduate programs in international affairs.

Georgetown also ranked first for its international affairs master’s degree programs in 2007, 2009 and 2012 in the magazine’s rankings.

The magazine cited Georgetown’s two-year master’s programs, which allow students to supplement coursework with mentorship from its prestigious faculty, as well as with professional internships in Washington, D.C., and abroad.

Service of Humanity

"We are both proud and flattered that Georgetown University again ranks high among the schools to study international affairs,” says James Reardon-Anderson, School of Foreign Service (SFS) interim dean. “This is a great credit to the students, faculty and staff of Georgetown and confirms the wisdom of our commitment to education for the service of humanity."

The oldest school of its kind in the world, SFS is home to eight graduate programs spanning many issues and regions.

Thematic degrees include the Master of Science in Foreign Service, Master of Arts in Security Studies and Master of Global Human Development.

Regionally focused degrees span the globe, including separate Master of Arts degrees in: Asian Studies, Arab Studies, Russian, Eurasian and East European Studies, German and European Studies and Latin American Studies.

Rigorous Education

The SFS undergraduate program offers 1,500 students over four years the opportunity to earn a Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service (BSFS).

The program features an interdisciplinary liberal arts core curriculum that focuses on the study of international affairs. 

Students undergo a rigorous education that includes courses in international affairs, government, economics, philosophy, theology, history, literature, language training and geography.

According to Foreign Policy, “the ... survey offers a window into how America’s top IR (international relations) scholars see the world today – and which institutions are effectively nurturing future generations of thinkers and policymakers.”

Foreign Policy Wonks

A collaboration between Foreign Policy and the Teaching, Research, and the International Policy (TRIP) project at the College of William and Mary, the survey gathered responses from 1,615 international relations scholars drawn from 1,375 U.S. colleges and universities.

The survey also asked about trends in international affairs and which issues are the most important foreign policy issues to the United States today. Answers ranged from global climate change to armed conflict in the Middle East to China’s rising military power.

Foreign Policy noted that while there are debates about higher education, “scholars and policymakers alike rightly agree, however, that language skills, expertise about regions of the world, and other knowledge gleaned in the classroom make for a stronger, more effective corps of foreign-policy wonks.”