Overview Anchor

Overview

Earlier this semester a group of students, the Black Survivors Coalition (BSC), raised important concerns about our campus climate and how our campus resources could be improved to meet the needs of Black students.

We respect our students and are committed to hearing their stories and their lived experiences. President John J. DeGioia and administrators from a number of departments have met with students on the specific topics that they have raised. These colleagues include academic leadership along with leaders from our offices of Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS), Georgetown University Police Department (GUPD), Institutional Diversity, Equity & Affirmative Action (IDEAA), Title IX, and several other Student Affairs administrators.

The students have proposed many ideas for improving the responsiveness of our resources. This web page shares some of the student proposals, work already underway, and some of the commitments that we have made to students. We see these commitments as the start of our work, rather than its completion. We recognize that continuing to improve the culture of Georgetown University, so it is a welcoming and supportive place for all students, will require a long term effort. We are firmly committed to that effort and will continue to provide proactive communications that demonstrate this work. We launched a quarterly newsletter to our community to provide transparency and accountability to our commitments.

As we implement these commitments, we encourage all students to visit the university’s Sexual Misconduct Resource Center, which was developed with extensive student input.

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Messages to the Community Anchor

Messages to the Community

May 1, 2020: Update on Inclusion and Strengthening Our Campus Climate

April 1, 2020: Update on Inclusion and Strengthening Our Campus Climate

February 28, 2020: Strengthening our Campus Community

February 26, 2020: Update on Student Protest in Healy Hall

January 31, 2020: University Commitments to Inclusion and to Strengthening Our Campus Climate Website

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Commitments and Progress Anchor

Commitments and Progress

1. Publicly respond to the Black Survivors Coalition by January 31, 2020.

 

Summary: After dialogue with students, an interim broadcast message was sent on Wednesday, February 26, from Rosemary Kilkenny and Todd Olson addressing the protest and commitments. President DeGioia communicated in a broadcast message to the university community on Friday, February 28. We are committed to sending a regular, quarterly newsletter in response to the Black Survivors Coalition that updates all students on campus resource improvements and the campus climate.

Additional Context: Georgetown University wrote to student leaders on Friday, January 31 through a letter sent by Rosemary E. Kilkenny, Esq., vice president, diversity, equity & inclusion and chief diversity officer and Todd A. Olson, Ph.D., vice president for student affairs. We also publicly shared University Commitments to Inclusion and to Strengthening Our Campus Climate

On Thursday, February 20, Rosemary Kilkenny and other senior leaders from IDEAA spent three hours meeting with student organizers. 

President DeGioia met with student organizers on Monday, February 24 and Friday, February 28. Senior administrators continue to meet with students. A university broadcast email from Rosemary Kilkenny and Todd Olson addressing the protest and commitments was sent on Wednesday, February 26, and a follow-up message from President DeGioia was sent on Friday, February 28.

Administrators continue to meet with students to address these issues.

 

2. Hire more Black clinicians, and contract out Black clinicians to be available on a biweekly or monthly basis until clinicians have been permanently hired.

 

Summary: We commit to increasing diversity among CAPS staff. Mohammed Basith will fill CAPS’ open psychiatry position in early June, Anthea “Anne” Kim will fill the case manager position in mid-June, and Shieka Glenn will join as a postdoc in August.

On March 16, CAPS shared with the BSC that it contracted with a number of mental health providers (all women of color) to offer counseling services to Black survivors, free of charge.

Additional Context: Beginning in November 2019, Georgetown offered extended hours for emergency clinicians in triage spaces for students to receive counseling at the Center for Multicultural Equity and Access (CMEA), the LGBTQ Center, the Women’s Center and the Center for Student Engagement, both during and after regular business hours, to offer urgently needed triage and counseling to those in distress. In January 2020, CAPS redoubled its programming for staff in diversity, equity and inclusion issues, focusing on fostering multicultural competence, including a workshop on microaggressions. While this programming has been ongoing, it has now grown more frequent and is happening every two weeks. Also beginning January 2020, CAPS has doubled the amount of time John C. Wright, associate director for diversity initiatives, spends at CMEA.

On March 16, CAPS shared with the BSC that it worked to arrange contracts with a number of mental health providers (all women and femmes of color) in the District of Columbia to offer greater opportunity for counseling services for our diverse community around issues of trauma, sexual harassment and assault. These services are free of charge to students. These 13 clinicians’ contracts have been extended through December 2020, and students can make appointments by contacting the provider of their choice directly by phone or email.

 

3. Bolster the Women’s Center capacity for supporting survivors by permanently implementing the gender-based violence specialist position; eliminating Ph.D. requirements for hiring; including language that encourages women of color to apply; and including students who are women of color in student-run interviews for open positions.

 

Summary: We are committed to appropriate staffing to address issues of gender-based violence. Moving forward, we will study how to best supplement our efforts on this important work amid a financial environment that required focusing resources on immediate student needs related to COVID-19.

A new associate director of the Women’s Center, Annie Selak, has recently been hired (there was no Ph.D. requirement for this position). We will continue our practice of including a diverse group of students in interviews for student-facing positions.

Additional context: In January 2020, Annie Selak was named associate director at the Georgetown Women’s Center. Her work focuses on student programming, mentoring experiences and building a network of support for students. Annie also has experience with addressing intersectional issues related to women’s experiences, such as race and class. We previously had a part-time position that was shared between the Women’s Center and Health Education Services (HES) dedicated to gender-based violence work. 

Moving forward, we will study how to best supplement our efforts on this important work.

There is no Ph.D. requirement for employment in the Women’s Center. We are committed to hiring staff across Georgetown, including in HES, CAPS, Residential Living, who have experience and a demonstrated commitment to serving students of color, women and underserved communities. Georgetown undertakes outreach and positive recruitment activities to effectively recruit women, disabled individuals, veterans, LGBTQ professionals and members of underrepresented populations. It is the practice of this university and its departments to advertise vigorously and to recruit and hire qualified candidates.

 

4. Require comprehensive mandatory diversity, bias and bystander training for all deans, faculty, coaches and Student Affairs staff, and publicly release data on the training’s content, frequency and attendance.

 

Summary: When the mandatory “RESPECT Training: Preventing Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct” course was launched several years ago, we achieved full compliance, and we continue to require all new employees to take this course. Ever-Fi’s “Preventing Harassment and Discrimination” will replace RESPECT as the online base course for employee training. The new base course will launch in fall 2020, and, like RESPECT, be required of all employees.

In addition to the online courses, IDEAA staff, as well as Title IX colleagues, provide live training throughout the year for faculty and staff upon request. The athletics department also routinely offers training for the coaching staff, as well as other support staff related to these issues, in collaboration with internal and external partners, such as the Title IX office, HES and IDEAA.

A comprehensive list of these courses and trainings will be maintained on the IDEAA website. 

Additional context: In partnership with the Department of Human Resources, IDEAA is enhancing comprehensive university-wide training. IDEAA and HR are currently identifying partners across the Georgetown community to build an engaging network of training opportunities to advance inclusive excellence.

Upon hiring and onboarding, all Georgetown University faculty and staff are required to complete the mandatory “RESPECT Training: Preventing Discrimination, Harassment and Sexual Misconduct.” The program provides valuable information about how to define discrimination, harassment and sexual misconduct, and describes the employees’ roles, rights and responsibilities as members of the university community. Ever-Fi’s “Preventing Harassment and Discrimination” will replace RESPECT as the online base course for employee training. The new base course will launch in fall 2020, and, like RESPECT, be required of all employees. Following the launch of the base course, IDEAA will launch a train-the-trainer course in which discussion facilitators representing all segments of the university will be taught to offer live training.

The Division of Student Affairs has launched an Equity Series, centered on issues of diversity, equity and inclusion, in its professional development. All Student Affairs staff will participate in this series. We commit to including a session in this series that will focus on sexual-based violence and bystander intervention, supporting students impacted by trauma and marginalized students. The first session of this series was an Equity Day, focused on these issues and understanding identity and building staff capacity in these critical areas.

Throughout the 2018-2019 academic year, the Title IX coordinator visited approximately 20 faculty departments to lead trainings on mandatory reporting requirements and to answer questions about what happens when a report is made to the Office of Title IX Compliance. She also provided information about the resources and support available for members of the community, including students, faculty and staff.

During the last few academic years, the Title IX coordinator and the interpersonal violence training and education specialist from HES have provided bystander and Title IX training to several different faculty and staff departments on an ad hoc basis.

The Title IX Office and IDEAA have also conducted live trainings covering topics including Title IX, diversity, inclusion and bias. This year, IDEAA and members of the General Counsel’s office provided training on implicit bias for Medical Center staff. Additionally, the dean of the College offered training on implicit bias to all search committee chairs and the designees whose departments are undergoing national searches to fill faculty positions.

The athletics department also routinely offers diversity training for the coaching staff as well as other support staff. Over the previous year, the athletics department hosted several educational initiatives for student athletes, coaches and staff including Huddle Up, Brenda Tracy and Derek Greenfield. Additionally, all incoming student athletes participate in required annual “Bringing in the Bystander” training conducted by Georgetown University. The athletics department also coordinates educational initiatives for coaches and staff via monthly head coach roundtables, the three-day immersive Coaches Leadership Institute and the annual two-day Coaches Summit involving campus partners, including IDEAA and the Title IX office.

 

5. Establish a Women’s and Gender Studies Department, and create a mandatory class that discusses sexual assault prevention, consent in platonic and sexual relationships, resources in Georgetown and the DMV, and the nuances of race, class, gender and sexual orientation in sexual assault prevention.

 

Summary: Georgetown College hired a new tenured faculty leader for the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, Nadia Brown, who will start August 1, 2021. Under the new director’s leadership, we commit to exploring ways to maximize the reach of the program, including making it a department, and to including students in this process.  

Georgetown College will engage in a curriculum review of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program. We commit to faculty/student partnerships and offering opportunities for research and compensation review for current WGST faculty. We commit to prioritizing WGST now and making sure it is adequately resourced. We commit to WGST meetings twice per semester to provide updates.

We currently offer three courses that address sexual assault prevention. The Main Campus Core Curriculum Committee is tasked with reviewing and adapting the Core Curriculum. They are currently engaged in a multi-year pilot of a new core curriculum, which includes Title IX for a New Generation (WGST-150). We commit to reviewing these offerings and our approach to training, and to exploring the ways that we can provide learning opportunities on these topics at scale.

Additional context: Georgetown University has committed new resources at the highest level to support the Women’s and Gender Studies Program. Georgetown College hired a new tenured faculty leader for the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, Nadia Brown, who will start August 1, 2021. The director will also bring in a wide spectrum of faculty members to engage with students and convene a new faculty advisory board. We will also provide financial support for faculty-student research opportunities. 

Once at least eight tenure-lined faculty members have expressed interest in affiliation with the unit, we can consider creating a new department. The creation of a new department must be approved by the faculty of Georgetown College, the provost, the president and the university’s Board of Directors. 

This summer, the College will continue to explore opportunities for wellness education. We recognize that there are several ways to address this, through the academic curriculum or other trainings. While there are several academic offerings in these areas, they don’t currently serve the needs of our entire population. We commit to reviewing these offerings and our approach to training and exploring ways that we can provide learning opportunities on these topics at scale.

The university currently offers three courses that address sexual assault prevention. Title IX for a New Generation (WGST-150) is a three-credit course that explores the law’s history and impact, analyzes recent national conversations about sex and gender in education, and takes a deep dive into how Title IX impacts our own Georgetown community. Relationship Violence and Sexual Assault from a U.S. Perspective (WGST-222) is a three-credit course that examines intimate partner violence, sexual assault and stalking. The course also examines theories, systems and policies, and discusses what we can do collectively as a community to end gender violence. Interpersonal Violence Prevention (JPS-248) is a one-credit course that explores models of understanding interpersonal violence, media portrayals of interpersonal violence, the shortcomings of current approaches and the tools we have to make change on both the local and national levels.

Director You-Me Park, Vice Dean Soyica Colbert and other faculty in the College will engage in a curriculum review of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, including courses that address sexual assault prevention, to ensure Nadia Brown is well-equipped to maximize the reach of the program when she begins as director in August 2021. A report with the results will be available to the community following the review.

All Georgetown students are required to take two Engaging Diversity courses to ensure the opportunity to engage with diversity issues in two different contexts: one domestic and one global. The Engaging Diversity Requirement will prepare students to be responsible, reflective, self-aware and respectful global citizens through recognizing the plurality of human experience and engaging with different cultures, beliefs and ideas.

WGST-150 was created and offered as part of the Enhancing and Transforming the Core Curriculum Initiative, a multi-year pilot development initiative intended to deepen the experience of the core curriculum for students. The design course this past fall and the implementation course in the spring are both part of the pilot and innovation process approved by the Main Campus Core Curriculum Committee. The initiative especially encouraged proposals that include “students as partners in both design and instruction” of the piloted courses.

Additionally, new students are required to participate in a robust educational program aimed at addressing sexual assault. This includes online courses, Alcohol.edu and SAPU (Sexual Assault Prevention for Undergraduates), before arriving on campus. The “I Am Ready” program is offered during New Student Orientation and the mandatory, five-hour “Bringing in the Bystander” training is required during the first month on campus.

 

6. Open a 24/7 crisis response center that has clinicians on staff 24/7, paid time-and-a-half; tracks open beds to temporarily house students who feel unsafe; and follows the approach of Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN). Expand crisis resources on campus by regularly extending walk-in hours at CAPS and the Student Health Center during nights and weekends and implementing an after-hours and weekend hotline staffed by a specialist or clinician, paid time-and-a-half, and trained in sexual assault response and trauma-informed crisis care.

 

Summary: We are committed to a thorough exploration of options to provide 24/7 support for survivors on campus. We hear the urgency of this interest, and will work to identify potential approaches, and respond to students by May, including appropriate consultation with students (including student leaders in SAPE).

We are also committed to continuing to enhance our “hotline” services, and we are exploring a partnership with a confidential provider that would allow Georgetown students to receive additional 24/7 support from a trained support specialist who could connect students directly with both Georgetown and community resources. We have connected with other schools and learned that they use a mix of national and local providers for after-hours service. The COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to quickly form new partnerships, but we are committed to continuing to price the available providers and find the one that is the best fit for our community. Once the university returns to normal operating status, we will re-engage with the possibility of forming new partnerships.

Professional staff from Residential Living (e.g., community directors) are on duty 24/7, and they routinely respond to student needs during nighttime and weekend hours. We commit to exploring how these community directors, faculty-in-residence and residential ministers can receive additional training on these topics. 

Interim measures, including housing reassignments, are promptly put in place, as needed. We use an established system for tracking open beds.

For mental health emergencies after-hours, CAPS offers an after-hours phone service through a partnership with Fonemed, a national provider of on-call behavioral health services, to ensure 24/7 access to services.

Students can receive additional support through the DC Forensic Nurse Examiners Program at MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC, which provides the most comprehensive care for survivors of sexual assault. Students can contact the On-Call Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (24/7) to get a free Uber to MedStar Washington Hospital Center at 1-844-4HELPDC (1-844-443-5732).

24-hour confidential services are provided by:

RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network Online Hotline)

DC Rape Crisis Center – 202-333-RAPE

UASK DC – Download the app or go to UASK DC website

We will continue working to enhance our current crisis response framework and will engage with students on approaches to improvements.

Additional context: Staff from Residential Living and GUPD are on duty 24/7, and they routinely respond to student needs during nighttime and weekend hours. For mental health emergencies after-hours, CAPS offers an after-hours phone service through a partnership with Fonemed, a national provider of on-call behavioral health services to ensure 24/7 access to services. Fonemed’s behavioral nurses are trained to navigate the full spectrum of mental health concerns that CAPS after-hours has serviced, including, but not limited to: symptoms of anxiety, depression, eating disorders, drug and alcohol abuse, response to sexual violence, suicidality and psychiatric medication questions. CAPS staff are available for back-up and follow-up phone calls where necessary after being briefed by Fonemed representatives.

CAPS has expanded its availability as well. While the university is in a remote learning environment, CAPS staff and clinicians remain available to assess and, as appropriate, treat students using secure video platforms. The best way for new clients to reach CAPS for routine care during regular business hours is to leave a message at 202-687-6985. A staff member will get back to you within one to two hours – unless it is the end of the day, in which case you will be contacted by phone the next business day.

Many medical options are available to students on- and off-campus, 24/7. As the home of the DC Forensic Nurse Examiners Program, MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC, provides the most comprehensive care for survivors of sexual assault and, if possible, should be the first place survivors visit for medical care. Students can contact the On-Call Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (24/7) to get a free Uber to MedStar Washington Hospital Center at 1-844-4HELPDC (1-844-443-5732). Through MedStar Washington Hospital Center, students receive support services by victim advocates from DC Rape Crisis Center, referrals to counseling and crime victim compensation, evidence collection by nurses with specialized training and STI testing and treatment.

Students can get same-day or next business day access to crisis counselors and advocacy on campus by sending an email to sarp@georgetown.edu. This email only goes to confidential counselors at Health Education Services. 

Cultural competence is central to training for clinicians, social workers and psychiatrists who are employed by various units on campus, such as CAPS and HES. Staff are obligated to acquire significant hours of continuing education credits in their practice, including diversity education, in order to maintain their licenses, and this requirement extends to their continuing employment at Georgetown University. In addition to that state licensing requirement, CAPS engages in regular twice monthly staff development meetings on the topic of cultural competence/diversity issues.

Community directors in the Office of Residential Living are also available on a rotating 24/7 basis precisely to intervene and provide emergency housing in cases where students need to be relocated because of harassment and/or related matters. The community director on duty (CDOD) can be reached after hours by calling GUPD at 202-687-4343.

Payment of time-and-a-half wages applies to hourly workers and not salaried employees.

Residential Living utilizes an ongoing system for tracking open beds. When students inform Georgetown University of the need for emergency housing, we promptly respond and place them in alternative housing.

We regularly point students to RAINN and utilize a trauma-informed approach aligned with RAINN guidance in our university resources. The university’s “Bringing in the Bystander” training, for example, has a 5.0 out of 5.0 score from students and administrators who rated the program through RAINN.

Additionally, GUPD established a specialized Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) comprising officers who have received enhanced training to respond to reports of sexual assault and misconduct. All GUPD officers undergo standard training on responding to reports of sexual assault and misconduct. GUPD works in coordination with campus partners and can explain university and criminal processes to help ensure survivors understand all options moving forward. Additionally, the majority of GUPD officers have completed a Crisis Intervention Trained (CIT) Officer Program. This training is conducted through partnerships with the National Association of Mental Illness (NAMI), DC Behavioral Health and counseling staff from institutions of higher education across the region.

We will continue working to enhance our current crisis response framework and will engage with students on approaches to improvements.

 

7. Provide greater resources for Black female survivors by hiring a culturally competent Black trauma specialist and more Black staff members within the Title IX office and Office of Student Conduct; requiring and releasing data on GUPD officer completion of cultural competency and implicit bias training, also open to students; and provide public monthly updates on vacant positions and include students in all of the hiring processes.

 

Summary: We commit to improving the diversity of our counseling staff, promoting cultural competency training among staff members, and sharing language used in the hiring process. Mohammed Basith will fill CAPS’ open psychiatry position in early June, Anthea “Anne” Kim will fill the case manager position in mid-June, and Shieka Glenn will join as a postdoc in August. The Title IX office recently hired a Title IX and civil rights investigator, Sarah Onori, who began in February 2020.

GUPD trainings will be included in the comprehensive list of trainings provided by IDEAA. New paid student positions for the summer of 2020 were announced on April 1, and these students will work with GUPD on reviewing and developing these trainings. We commit to allowing a predetermined group of students to attend relevant parts of the training. We agree to provide a summary of these trainings in the annual Clery security report and list the names of all GUPD officers and a list of their completed implicit bias/cultural competency training (with dates of completion) on the GUPD website.

We commit to continuing student inclusion in the hiring processes for student-facing positions; providing regular updates on vacant positions and using recruitment techniques designed to attract a diverse pool of qualified candidates including candidates of color and candidates from the LGBTQ community; and providing students with quarterly updates (through a newsletter and website) on our work relating to Title IX, sexual violence and the campus climate.

Additional context: CAPS has been actively hiring for a range of key positions. Mohammed Basith will fill CAPS’ open psychiatry position in early June, Anthea “Anne” Kim will fill the case manager position in mid-June, and Shieka Glenn will join as a postdoc in August.

Our Offices of Student Conduct and IDEAA (which oversees Title IX) are both led by Black women. The Title IX office recently hired a Title IX and civil rights investigator, Sarah Onori, who began in February 2020, after consulting with key campus partners and students with diverse identities.

All GUPD officers are required to participate in annual training focused on bias and cultural competency (including microaggressions and implicit bias in policing). A list of all GUPD officers and their photos were added to the GUPD website with the dates they completed implicit bias trainings. New GUPD hires will receive the implicit bias/cultural competency training upon their hiring. We commit to allowing a predetermined group of students to attend relevant parts of the training. Preference will be given to students who are a part of GUAPA or the Black Survivors Coalition. Officers also complete online training on bias several times a year. We commit to sharing the content of these trainings with students. GUPD created new paid student positions for the summer of 2020, announced on April 1, and these students will work with GUPD on reviewing and developing these trainings. We agree to provide a summary of these trainings in the annual Clery security report.

GUPD created a centralized page to submit complaints, compliments and/or feedback. The page can be accessed via the “Feedback, Complaints, Compliments” navigation on the GUPD website.

We also invite students to share their input and concerns by joining the Student Safety Advisory Board (SSAB), a student group that meets bi-weekly with Chief of Police Jay Gruber during the academic year and is instrumental in helping us improve safety and security. Students can join the SSAB by emailing police@georgetown.edu.

GUPD recently organized a department-wide seminar in 2020 on stereotypes, bias, implicit bias and microaggressions facilitated by Benjamin Reese, a renowned expert on these issues. The workshop gave officers the opportunity to actively participate in discussions around preventing bias. This presentation is part of a continuing training series on issues of bias, implicit bias and diversity in law enforcement and higher education.

The leadership of GUPD plans to engage Benjamin Reese to work with the department on a periodic basis to keep the department focused on community policing in an inclusive way.

We commit to developing new ways to build community between GUPD and students of color.

We commit to continuing student inclusion in the hiring processes for Title IX and Student Affairs-related positions. We commit to providing regular updates on vacant positions and to using recruitment techniques designed to attract a diverse pool of qualified candidates. We also commit to providing students with quarterly updates on our work relating to Title IX, sexual violence and the campus climate.

 

8. Increase funding for Sexual Assault Peer Educators (SAPE) and require student club executive boards to complete training, or receive funding sanctions.

 

Summary: We commit to additional funds for the SAPE Program and to ensuring that SAPE students who conduct trainings are paid for facilitation in the same way facilitators for “Bringing in the Bystander” are paid. 

Additional context: Additional funds will be provided for the SAPE Program, and the SAPE students who conduct trainings will be paid for facilitation in the same way facilitators for “Bringing in the Bystander” are paid. 

In 2016, the university introduced bystander intervention education training for student leaders. Since then, mandatory bystander education has expanded to include all incoming and transfer students. All new graduate students also take a mandatory online course, and returning undergraduates have access to online refresher courses and other programming from SAPE, GUPD, Title IX and other offices. In her role as Title IX coordinator, Samantha Berner has been reaching out to student groups to offer individualized trainings.

All incoming students are required to complete the five-hour in-person bystander training, “Bringing in the Bystander.” The requirement is enforced with a registration hold, and we have achieved full compliance with this requirement. We commit to revising and enhancing training for student leaders to ensure comprehensive coverage of these vital topics and making sure that implementation of training is trauma informed, with opt-outs as needed.

We are currently reviewing the revised curriculum and will customize it for both new students and student leaders at Georgetown and modify it to meet the needs of student groups and organizations.

 

9. Improve campus “safe” transportation (student guards, SafeRide drivers, SafeWalk).

 

Summary: We added a third SafeRides van on Monday, March 2 and will add a fourth SafeRides van on the three nights of the week when it is most highly utilized (Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday). The fourth SafeRides Van will be purchased after July 1 and enter into service when the university becomes fully operational. Limited service will be available for those students living in the university’s residence halls over the summer. New student hires (for SafeRide drivers and student guards) would be vetted through student conduct and Title IX. If found responsible for sexual misconduct, or if there is an investigation pending relating to an allegation of sexual misconduct, they will not be hired. We commit that any security officer who serves as a SafeRides driver is clearly identified in that role. We commit that all student SafeRides drivers will receive SAPE training when the university is operating at full capacity.

Additional Context: The SafeRides program provides a safe alternative to walking alone at night for Georgetown University staff, students and faculty. SafeRides service provides point-to-point service on campus and to close by off-campus neighborhoods. SafeRides runs from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Sunday through Wednesday and until 3 a.m. Thursday through Saturday.

There have been no reported safety incidents with SafeRides. SafeWalk was discontinued in 2018 due to lack of utilization. GUPD has committed that all SafeRides drivers will receive SAPE training when the university is operating at full capacity. SafeRides are provided to any and all campus-owned buildings and/or residences along with off-campus residences in the SafeRides Service Area. GUPD added a third SafeRides van on Monday, March 2 and will put a newly purchased fourth SafeRides van into service on the three nights of the week when it is most highly utilized (Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday) when the university is operating at full capacity. We will review the wait times of SafeRides when the university is operating at full capacity and implement a comprehensive plan to meet demand if we find that there are additional needs.

New student hires (for saferide drivers and student guards) would be vetted through student conduct and Title IX. If found responsible for sexual misconduct, or if there is an investigation pending relating to an allegation of  sexual misconduct, they will not be hired.

We commit that any security officer who serves as a SafeRides driver is clearly identified in that role. We will explore the possibility of making safety officers confidential resources.

 

10. Establish an endowment for the Off-Campus Mental Health Stipend.

 

Summary: We commit to providing a minimum of $15,000 per year in this fund beginning with the 2020-2021 academic year and pursuing potential donors for additional funding. We will continue to raise awareness of this fund, and we included an update in the first quarterly newsletter.

Additional context: We are in our second year of an off-campus mental health services fund, in partnership with GUSA, for students with financial need. We will increase the level of institutional resources committed to this program while we work to secure donor support. For the 2020-2021 academic year, we commit to a minimum of $15,000 in this fund for undergraduates. We commit to continuing this fund going forward. As an endowment requires a donor gift, we are pursuing this option and will keep students updated on our efforts.

 

Page last updated Thursday, May 28, 2020.

 

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