This page explains Georgetown’s policies and procedures for COVID-19 quarantine and isolation. Quarantine is the term used for staying separate from others if a person may have been exposed to COVID-19 until that person can be sure they are not infected. Isolation is the term used for staying separate from others because a person is known or strongly suspected to be infected with COVID-19.

Quarantine Anchor

Quarantine

The purpose of quarantine is to keep people at high risk of developing COVID-19 separate from others until they can be sure they do not have COVID-19. Quarantine is particularly important for COVID-19 because some people are able to transmit the virus to others before they show symptoms, test positive, or know they have COVID-19.

Georgetown University students, faculty and staff will self-quarantine, including as directed by Georgetown or by the DC Department of Health or relevant state or local public health authorities.

Exposure to Someone with COVID-19

If you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 (i.e., less than 6 feet away from an infected person for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period), please follow the guidance below.

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If You Are Up to Date on Vaccination (i.e., fully vaccinated and boosted, or recently fully vaccinated and not yet booster-eligible)You do not need to quarantine.

Please test on Day 5 following your most recent known exposure (the day of exposure counts as Day 0). If you receive a positive result, you will need to follow the isolation protocol below.

Wear a properly-fitted, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95, KF94) around others for a total of 10 days since the date of exposure. If you are on campus during this period, you should wear an N95, KN95, or KN94.

If you develop symptoms, please stay home, report symptoms through the COVID-19 Symptom Check-In survey via the GU360 app or website, and schedule a PCR test through the One Medical app or website.
If You Are Not Up to Date on Vaccination (i.e., unvaccinated, partially vaccinated, or fully vaccinated and eligible for a booster shot but have not received a booster shot yet)Stay in quarantine for at least 5 full days after your most recent known exposure, and report this exposure through the COVID-19 Symptom Check-In survey via the GU360 app or website. 

Take a PCR test as soon as possible and again on Day 5 of quarantine (the day of exposure counts as Day 0).

– If you receive a negative result from the test taken on Day 5 and do not have symptoms, a Georgetown University COVID-19 Care Navigator will notify you that you can end quarantine on Day 6.

– If you receive a positive result, you will need to follow the isolation protocol below.

If you do not take a test and do not have symptoms, a Care Navigator will notify you that you can end quarantine on Day 11 (after 10 full days in quarantine).

If you develop symptoms at any point, complete the COVID-19 Symptom Check-In survey via the GU360 mobile app or website and continue or return to quarantine, and get tested as soon as possible.

Wear a properly-fitted, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95, KF94) around others for a total of 10 days after the date of exposure. If you are on campus during this period, you should wear an N95, KN95, or KN94.
If You Have Tested Positive for COVID-19 in the Previous 90 Days (regardless of vaccination status)You do not need to quarantine.
 
Wear a properly-fitted, high-quality mask (e.g., N95, KN95) when around others for ten days after the date of exposure. If you are on campus during this period, you should wear an N95, KN95, or KN94.
 
If you develop symptoms, stay home, report symptoms through the COVID-19 Symptom Check-In survey via the GU360 app or website, and follow your physician’s and Care Navigators’ guidance for potential testing.

Where to Quarantine

If you are a student living on campus, you must remain in your residence for the duration of your quarantine period until released by a Care Navigator. There are some exceptions–you may leave for COVID-19 testing, medical appointments, trash disposal, emotional support animal or service animal care, or to do your laundry. When you leave your room, you must follow all public health guidelines (e.g., mask-wearing). You may not have guests in your room or apartment (including apartments where one roommate is in quarantine and the other is not). You will receive meals and other essentials delivered to your residence while you are in quarantine.

PopulationAction
On-Campus StudentsSelf-quarantine in your on-campus residence. (University staff will deliver meals and other essentials to undergraduate students in self-quarantine who live on campus.)
Off-Campus StudentsSelf-quarantine in your off-campus residence. (The University is not able to provide on-campus space, arrange food delivery, or provide other services to off-campus students who are required to self-quarantine at this time.)
Faculty and StaffSelf-quarantine in your residence.

Isolation Anchor

Isolation

Georgetown University students, faculty and staff will isolate if they receive a positive COVID-19 test result. Isolation is stricter than quarantine and is used to curb the spread of the virus by separating people who have tested positive or are sick with the virus from people who are not infected.

Individuals who test positive through One Medical testing or report a positive test result via the COVID-19 Test Result Submission Form will automatically receive an email from Georgetown’s Care Navigator team with important information about isolation protocols. Please make sure to review the email thoroughly and follow all instructions.

Individuals who test positive for COVID-19, regardless of vaccination status, previous infection or the presence or absence of symptoms, will need to isolate for at least 5 full days.

In order to be cleared from isolation by a Care Navigator on Day 6, individuals must satisfy all of the criteria below:

  1. Not have any symptoms or, if mildly or moderately symptomatic, be fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication and other symptoms are improving, AND
  2. Receive a negative result from an antigen test taken on Day 5.
    • Test results must be reported to Georgetown by submitting the COVID Test Result Submission Form.
    • Care Navigators will help provide access to antigen tests. In addition, free rapid antigen at-home tests can be ordered through COVIDtests.gov and DC residents can pick up free rapid antigen test kits at several locations throughout DC.
    • DO NOT get a PCR test unless instructed by a Care Navigator or a physician.

Some situations will require longer isolation.

  • If an individual tests positive on the Day 5 test, chooses not to test, does not have access to an antigen test, or their symptoms continue, they will have to discuss the end of isolation with the Care Navigator team. If an individual has had a severe or critical infection (i.e., requiring oxygen, hospitalization or critical care) they will need to isolate for at least 10 days and be cleared by a physician.
  • If an individual is unable to wear a mask (i.e., has an approved accommodation from the University), they must isolate for 10 days.
  • Individuals who are immunocompromised often need to isolate for longer than 10 days. This will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

If leaving isolation before Day 11, individuals will need to wear a properly-fitted, high-quality mask (N95, KN95, or KF94 recommended) indoors and outdoors when around others, for a total of 10 days since the date they tested positive or started to experience symptoms. If they are on campus during this period, wearing an N95, KN95 or KN94 is required. N95s and KN95s are available for free at the entrances to many university buildings.

 

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Where to Isolate

PopulationAction
On-Campus StudentsYou will be relocated to a dedicated University-provided isolation space. (University staff will deliver meals and other essentials to undergraduate students in isolation who live on campus.)
Students Living in the Georgetown, Burleith, or Foxhall NeighborhoodsIsolate in your off-campus residence. Undergraduate students living in the Neighborhoods may be offered the opportunity to isolate on campus. (The University will accommodate isolation requests, if possible, but we may not be able to accommodate all requests.)
Students Living Outside of the NeighborhoodsIsolate in your off-campus residence. (The University cannot accommodate isolation requests from students living outside of the Neighborhoods.)
Faculty and StaffIsolate in your residence.
Resources for On-Campus Students Anchor

Resources for On-Campus Students

Please visit the Isolation Support site for more information for residential students who are in isolation on campus.

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Information for Off-Campus Students, Faculty and Staff Anchor

Information for Off-Campus Students, Faculty and Staff

What to do if you are in isolation?

  • If you live with others, isolation means you should stay in your room and avoid contact with your housemates.
  • Don’t leave your room unless you have to attend a medical appointment.
  • Use a separate bathroom, if one is available. If not, make sure to not be present in the bathroom at the same time as your uninfected housemate. Wear a mask, except to shower, shave or brush your teeth.
  • If you are sick, monitor your symptoms. Call your doctor if your symptoms are getting worse. Call 911 if you are having trouble breathing.
  • Don’t share personal household items, like cups, towels, and utensils
  • Wear a properly-fitted, high-quality mask (e.g. N95, KN95) – even outdoors – when around other people (e.g., if you have to go to a medical appointment).

Plan ahead!

It is important to discuss the possibility of isolation and quarantine with your housemates. Create a plan that all household members agree to follow. Topics to discuss include:

  • Do you have COVID-19 rapid antigen test kits at home in case you need them? Free rapid antigen at-home tests can be ordered through COVIDtests.gov, and DC residents can pick up free rapid antigen test kits at several locations throughout DC.
  • Should you designate one room as the “sick” room? (This might be a good solution if there is a room with its own separate bathroom.)
  • Does your household have adequate disinfecting and cleaning supplies?
  • How will food be delivered to you? Make a list of places that deliver groceries or prepared food.
  • What if you need medications delivered? Check which local pharmacies make deliveries.
  • Some people may want to quarantine or isolate elsewhere–for example, in a hotel. Prepare a list of local hotels ahead of time. 

If you are an off-campus student and have general questions, please contact the Office of Neighborhood Life (ONL) at 202-687-5138 (9 a.m – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday) or by email at neighborhoodlife@georgetown.edu.

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