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Georgetown Faculty Experts Analyze 2016 Presidential Elections

As the 2016 election season kicks into high gear, Georgetown faculty experts continue to analyze the dynamics of the U.S. presidential race and the issues facing voters and the candidates. The following faculty members are available to comment on a range of topics pertaining to the 2016 U.S. presidential elections – including American electoral history, the role of media in politics, polling and current policy debates. For assistance in booking an interview, please contact the Georgetown Office of Communications at 202-687-4328 or gucomm@georgetown.edu. Georgetown has a broadcast studio on campus available for use by broadcast outlets. Booking information can be found here.

James Angel, associate professor of finance, McDonough School of Business, specializes in the structure and regulation of financial markets around the world. His research focuses on short selling and regulation, and he teaches a number of courses, including Investments and Capital Markets.

Areas of Expertise:

• Bitcoin

• Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act

• Financial Markets

• Financial Regulation

• High-Tech/High-Frequency Trading

• Securities and Exchange Commission

• Social Security and Healthcare Reform

Michael Bailey, Colonel William J. Walsh Professor, Department of Government and McCourt School of Public Policy, teaches and conducts research on American politics and political economy, covering trade, Congress, election law and the Supreme Court, methodology and interstate policy competition.

Areas of Expertise:

• Campaign Finance

• Congress and the Supreme Court

• Separation of powers

 

Larry Downes, project director at the Georgetown Center for Business and Public Policy, is co-author of Big Bang Disruption: Strategy in the Age of Devastating Innovation (Penguin Group, 2014) and Unleashing the Killer App:  Digital Strategies for Market Dominance (Harvard Business School Press, 1998). He is author of The Laws of Disruption:  Harnessing the New Forces that Govern Life and Business in the Digital Age (Basic Books, 2009).

Areas of Expertise:

• Broadband/Media Industries

• Disruptive Innovation (e.g. drones, 3D printing, autonomous vehicles, artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, Bitcoin and crowd-funding)

• Intellectual property

• Regulation of technology industries (including FCC, FTC, FAA, FDA, SEC)

 

Mo Elleithee, founding executive director of the Georgetown University Institute of Politics and Public Service, spent nearly two decades as one of the top communications strategists in the Democratic Party – helping political leaders and organizations figure out how to tell their story. Most recently the communications director for the Democratic National Committee, he is a veteran of four presidential campaigns, including as senior spokesman for Hillary Clinton’s 2008 campaign.

Areas of Expertise:

• Electoral Politics and Election Strategy

• Media and Politics

• Presidential Politics

 

Judith Feder is a professor of public policy with a specialization in health policy.  She served as principal deputy assistant secretary for planning and evaluation at the Department of Health and Human Services in the Clinton administration and as a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (2008-2011). She is now an Institute Fellow at the Urban Institute.

Areas of Expertise:

• Affordable Care Act

• Health Policy

 

Aliza Glasner is an associate at Georgetown’s O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. Glasner’s primary research interest is in consumer protection law in the area of food and drug law and gun violence prevention.

Areas of Expertise:

• Law and Public Health

• Food and Drug Consumer Protection Law

• Gun Violence Prevention

 

Dr. Liza Gold, clinical professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical Center, is editor and author of Gun Violence and Mental Health (American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., 2016). Gold is board certified in general and forensic psychiatry and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. She teaches and lectures nationally, most recently in December 2015 at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, where a lone gunman killed nine people last year.

Areas of Expertise:

• Gun Violence and Mental Illness

• Mental Health Policy

 

William Gormley, University Professor of Public Policy, is co-director of the Center for Research on Children in the U.S. (CROCUS). Principal investigator for the Tulsa, Oklahoma, pre-K project. Gormley is the author of Voices for Children: Rhetoric and Public Policy (Brookings Institution Press, 2012.)

Areas of Expertise:

• Early Childhood Education

• Universal Pre-K

 

Lawrence Gostin, university professor and faculty director for the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, is the founding O'Neill Chair in Global Health Law. Gostin is also a professor of medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine and professor of public health at the Johns Hopkins University. His focus is on the use of law as a fundamental tool for solving critical public health challenges including gun violence.

Areas of Expertise:

• Law and Public Health

• Gun Violence Prevention

 

Harry Holzer, professor of public policy, McCourt School of Public Policy, previously served as chief economist for the U.S. Department of Labor and a professor of economics at Michigan State University.

Areas of Expertise:

• Jobs and the Economy

• Economics of Immigration

 

Brad Jensen, McCrane/Shaker Chair in International Business at the McDonough School of Business, is also a senior policy scholar at the Georgetown Center for Business and Public Policy. He is the author of Global Trade in Services: Fear, Facts, and Offshoring (Peter G. Petersen Institute for Global Economics, 2011).

Areas of Expertise:

• International trade

• Relationship between International Trade and Investment and Firm Performance

• Transpacific Partnership (TPP)

 

Michael Kazin, professor of history, is an expert in U.S. politics and social movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. Kazin’s most recent book is American Dreamers: How the Left Changed a Nation (Knopf, 2011), named a Best Book of 2011 by The New Republic, Newsweek/Daily Beast and The Progressive. He is editor of Dissent, a leading magazine of the American left, and is now at work on War against War: The Rise, Defeat, and Legacy of the American Peace Movement, 1914-1918, under contract to Simon and Schuster.

Areas of Expertise:

• Campaign Finance

• History of American Social Movements (19th & 20th Century)

• History of American Leftists Movements (19th & 20th Century)

• U.S. Politics

Matthew Kroenig, associate professor and international relations field chair in the government department, is a senior fellow in the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security at The Atlantic Council. He is an expert on U.S. national security policy and strategy and international relations and has authored or edited five books, including Nonproliferation Policy and Nuclear Posture: Causes and Consequences for the Spread of Nuclear Weapons (Routledge, 2015).

 

Areas of Expertise:

• Counterterrorism

• Foreign Policy

• National Security

• Nuclear Nonproliferation

Adriana Kugler, vice-provost for faculty and professor in the McCourt School of Public Policy, served as chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor in 2011 and 2012. At the Labor Department, she developed policies and proposals on unemployment insurance, training programs, retirement benefits, overtime pay and minimum wages, immigration, disability insurance and occupational safety regulations.

Areas of Expertise:

• Jobs and the Economy

• Economics of Immigration

 

Jonathan Ladd, associate professor in the McCourt School of Public Policy, studies the news media, partisan polarization and public opinion. He is currently involved in several projects investigating the relationship between the information environment and mass-level partisanship.

Areas of Expertise:

• Media and Politics

• Partisanship

• Public opinion

 

James Lengle, associate professor, Department of Government, teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on American politics, U.S. political parties and presidential elections.

Areas of Expertise:

• American Electoral History

• Presidential Election History

• U.S. Political Parties

 

Paasha Mahdavi, assistant professor in the McCourt School of Public Policy, is writing a book manuscript on the relationship between petroleum and governance as mediated by oil-related institutions. Some of his other projects include the political economy of gasoline prices; statistical network analysis of elites in authoritarian contexts; and transnational prosecutions of oil-related corruption. His research interests are comparative political economy, political methodology and energy politics.

Areas of Expertise:

• Energy Politics

• Iran Nuclear Deal

• Political Economy

• Methodology

 

Diana Owen, associate professor, Communications, Culture and Technology, is the author of Media Messages in American Presidential Elections (Greenwood, 1991), New Media and American Politics with Richard Davis (Oxford University Press, 1998) and American Government and Politics in the Information Age with David Paletz and Timothy Cook. Owen’s current research explores the relationship between civic education and political engagement over the life course and new media’s role in politics.

Areas of Expertise:

• Civic Education and Engagement

• Media and Politics

• Political Psychology

• Voting Behavior

 

Mark Rom, associate dean for academic affairs and co-director undergraduate studies in the McCourt School of Public Policy, is also the director of the masters’ program in American government studies. He studies American politics and public policy with a particular emphasis on social welfare policy.

Areas of Expertise:

• American Politics

• Ethics and Values in Public Policy

• Public Policy

• Social Welfare Policy

 

Lynn Ross, associate teaching professor in the McCourt School of Public Policy, is the faculty director of the Master of Policy Management Program (MPM). She teaches Public Management and Program Evaluation in the MPM Program and Public Policy Process and Public Management in the Master of Public Policy Program.

Areas of Expertise:

• Budgetary Politics

• Federal Bureaucracy

• Electoral Politics

 

Rob Shapiro, senior policy scholar at the Georgetown Center for Business and Public Policy, is chairman of Sonecon, LLC, a private firm that advises U.S. and foreign businesses, governments and nonprofit organizations. He also served as United States Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs from 1997 to 2001.

Areas of Expertise:

• Net Neutrality

• Globalization

 

Michele Swers, associate professor, Department of Government, researches and teaches about Congress, Congressional elections and Women and Politics. Co-author of the third edition of Women in Politics (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016), she is working on a project that examines differences in the policy views and support coalitions of Republican men and women in Congress.

 

Areas of Expertise:

• Congress and Congressional Elections

• Gender Differences in Policy Making

 

Catherine Tinsley, professor of management at the McDonough School of Business and faculty director of the Georgetown University Women's Leadership Institute. She participated in the World Economic Forum’s 2015 annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, where she took part in the Women’s Economic Empowerment discussion, as a primary investigator on the subject of “Women and Confidence.”

Areas of Expertise:

• Gender Pay Gap

• Impact of Family Medical Leave Act on Women in the Workplace