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Georgetown in the News

Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • Time to Move On
    September 13, 2010
    "The urge to view Islam through a prism of extremism remains strong and should be fought, since it is dangerous to confuse mainstream Muslims with extremists, who constitute a fraction of the world's 1.5 billion Muslims. " John Esposito, director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, on the view of Muslims in America.
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    Source: The Huffington Post

  • U.S. Effort to Help Afghanistan Fight Corruption has Complicated Ties
    September 10, 2010
    "I don't know how you can disaggregate the way in which [the U.S. government] has funneled money into Afghanistan from the crisis of corruption that presents itself today. We are a government at odds with ourselves." Christine Fair, assistant professor of foreign service, on the U.S. government's handling and relationship with of the Afghanistan government.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • Everyone Wants One, But Do Tax Cuts Really Work?
    September 9, 2010
    "Economists have many, many hands, and unfortunately, you know, it's hard to run good, clean experiments. You know, what you'd like to do is have an economy and then, you know, hit it with different tax things and how it responds. But, you know, Congress doesn't let us run the experiments economists would like. " Donald Marron, visiting professor at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute, on how economists look at the proposed tax cuts by the government.
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    Source: NPR

  • South Korea Sanctions Iran – Under U.S. Pressure
    September 8, 2010
    “It helped that the Japanese announced sanctions. The South Koreans couldn’t wait much longer.” Victor Cha, director of Asian studies and the D.S. Song-Korea Foundation Chair in Asian Studies and Government, on South Korea being under pressure to announce sanctions against Iran.
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    Source: The Christian Science Monitor

  • Putin More at Ease at This Year's Valdai Club - Expert
    September 6, 2010
    "Looking at [Putin] and his body language, he obviously feels comfortable in the current situation. But we won't rule out that he would run for president again. His tone was somewhat milder than it had sometimes been before. He appeared as a leader who feels the pulse of the nation." Angela Stent, director of the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies, on Russian Prime Minister Vladamir Putin's demeanor when speaking to members of the Valdai Discussion Club, which provides a global forum for experts on a Russia.
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    Source: RIA Novosti (Russia)

  • Saudi Legal Paradox Deters Investors as Disputes Go Unresolved
    September 5, 2010
    “The major problem with the commercial law in the kingdom is the lack of enforceability of judgments.” Jean-Francois Seznec, visiting associate professor in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the lack of enforcable commercial laws in Saudi Arabia.
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    Source: Bloomberg

  • How Do You Solve A Problem Like Hamid Karzai?
    September 4, 2010
    "They treated [Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai] more as someone who they believe they installed and then was validated by a first election and then maybe or maybe not validated by a second election. But I think the principle has been as long as he's one of ours, we can do this." Paula Newberg, director of the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy, on how the United States views Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai
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    Source: NPR

  • As Nationalism Rises, Will the European Union Fall?
    August 29, 2010
    "The European Union is dying -- not a dramatic or sudden death, but one so slow and steady that we may look across the Atlantic one day soon and realize that the project of European integration that we've taken for granted over the past half-century is no more." Charles Kupchan, professor of international affairs, in an op-ed on the slow death of the European Union.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • Smart and Fast, Marine Mammals are Guarding Our Military Bases
    August 28, 2010
    "They have to be constantly challenged in order not to be bored, and you can't imitate those challenges in a controlled environment." Janet Mann, a professor of psychology and biology, on why it is necessary to study dolphins in the wild rather than in captivity.
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    Source: The Seattle Times

  • For Critics of Islam, 'Sharia' a Loaded Word
    August 27, 2010
    "[There are] those who see sharia mandating that we live as Muslims did 1,300 years ago, and those who say sharia doesn't have a specific format as to how you live your life, that Islam gives you paradigms." Imam Yahya Hendi, Muslim chaplain, on two interpretations of Muslim sharia law.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • Boston Man Set Free in N. Korea
    August 27, 2010
    "They gave him a very harsh sentence, eight years in prison. There were concerns about his well-being, an American thrown into a prison in the worst human-rights-violating country of the world. I think we had to pay whatever price we needed to get this American out." Victor Cha, director of Asian studies and the D.S. Song-Korea Foundation Chair in Asian Studies and Government, on former President Carter going to North Korea to gain the release of American prisoner Aijalon Mahli Gomes.
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    Source: The Boston Globe

  • Missing the Point
    August 26, 2010
    "The for-profit college industry is taking fire from all directions because a substantial number of for-profit colleges offer aggressively marketed programs of little value in the job market, leaving individuals unable to repay their debts and saddling taxpayers with the default burden. Much of the bad press is deserved, but the atmosphere of scandal and abuse detracts from a larger point: We have failed to adequately connect college and careers. The current abuses are but the worst-case examples of this failure." Anthony Carnevale, director and research professor of the Center on Education and the Workforce, in an op-ed on the implications of the for-profit education market.
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    Source: Inside Higher Ed

  • A Ban on Federal Funding for Embryonic Stem Cell Research
    August 25, 2010
    "The debate we're having right now is, do human embryos count as human beings?" Kevin FitzGerald, SJ, PhD, research associate professor, on a judge's recent court order banning federal funding for embroynic stem cell research.
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    Source: CBS Evening News with Katie Couric

  • How to Handle Hamas
    August 24, 2010
    "The biggest obstacle to peace between Israelis and Palestinians is the emergence of Hamas as the de facto government of the Gaza Strip, where 1.5 million Palestinians reside. Peace talks can begin with Hamas on the sidelines, but they cannot finish if Hamas refuses to play ball." Daniel Byman, director of the Center for Peace and Security Studies, on the peace talks between Israel and Palestine.
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    Source: New York Times

  • Lobbying Regulated to Prevent Abuse in U.S.
    August 24, 2010
    "Here is the big thing: giving money to get something done -- that is illegal. Talking with someone to get things done -- that is not illegal. But there are lots of ways that money comes into the political process that make those boundaries hard to define. And, they are always open to dispute." Mark Rom, associate professor of public policy, on the boundaries between members of Congress and lobbyists.
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    Source: Voice of America

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