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Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • The Role Of New And Old Media In Egypt
    January 28, 2011
    "The new media has really infiltrated Egyptian society in a very significant way, that over 20 million Egyptian Internet users -- and many of them are on Facebook. So now they have another realm whereby they can resort to information. They can distribute the material. They can mobilize. They can move around. So it's created a whole new space for them to communicate, one that is not afforded to them using the traditional national press."

    Adel Iskandar, adjunct instructor in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the ability of the Egyptian protesters to communicate.

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    Source: NPR

  • As Egypt's Protests Spread, All Eyes on Army's Allegiance, Next Moves
    January 28, 2011
    "[Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak] is a president who has repeatedly said that the emergency law would be rescinded time and time again. This is a law that has been in place for over 30 years. And this is a president who has promised on multiple occasions to have free and fair elections. And the only things that are certain, unfortunately, about Egyptian elections is that they are not free and fair. "

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's leadership.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • Egypt Unrest Threatens Global Economy
    January 28, 2011
    "The levels of income in Saudi Arabia and many of these other Gulf states are three, four times what they are in Egypt and Yemen, for example, so economic difficulties certainly, high levels of unemployment, youth marginalization, but nothing close to countries like Egypt."

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on why the Egyptian protests will not spread to the Gulf states.

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    Source: PBS Nightly Business Report

  • Anti-Government Protests in Egypt
    January 27, 2011
    "Twenty percent of the population lives below poverty. And another 20 percent of the population lives, as you mentioned, very close to poverty, which means that if there were to be 20 percent inflation, as there has been over the last number of years in Egypt, they sink below poverty. So in addition to that, despite the wonderful macroeconomic statistics about growth and high levels of foreign direct investment and so on, income inequality and poverty have actually increased in Egypt over the last number of years, according to IMF and World Bank statistics. "

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on some of the reasons Egyptians are upset with President Mubarak.

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    Source: NPR

  • Analyst: Egypt Uprising Result of 'Tunisia Effect'
    January 26, 2011
    "Millions of people in the Arab world are overjoyed with what happened in Tunisia. They are thrilled, and they have been mesmerized with events ... and they hope that similar things can happen in their own countries."

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on the effect Tunisia's uprising may have on other Arab countries.

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    Source: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

  • Is The Arab World Ready For Regime Change?
    January 24, 2011
    "The grievances that Tunisians expressed during their revolution are widely shared across the majority of all Arabs who are among the category of the have-not. Pervasive popular economic misery, alongside corrupted autocratic rule that draws its legitimacy only from the security apparatuses, make the region vulnerable to political turmoil."

    Noureddine Jebnoun, adjunct assistant professor in Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the political turmoil in Tunisia.
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    Source: NPR

  • 'The Last Name Effect' -- Study Says Your Name Affects Your Buying Habits
    January 24, 2011
    "There are certain consumer promotions that look a lot like lining up -- limited time offers, limited availability, limited supply deals -- people near the end of the alphabet find these offers more appealing and are more likely to respond to them."

    Kurt Carlson, assistant professor of business, on his recent study that shows a consumer's last name affects their buying habits.

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    Source: The Huffington Post

  • A Statistical Look at the State of the Union
    January 24, 2011

    "There are two ways you evaluate a presidency. One, in terms of what he does. And the other, in terms of the difference it makes in people's lives. [President Obama has] done a lot [legislatively]. But many people have not seen enough of a difference in their lives to give him support."

    Stephen Wayne, professor of government, on President Obama's first two years in office.

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    Source: The Christian Science Monitor

  • Veterans in Congress at lowest level since World War II
    January 21, 2011
    "What this reflects is a classic debate of descriptive representation, meaning do I need a person that is a member of my group to adequately represent my views in Congress," Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on veterans' concerns with the lack of veterans serving in Congress.
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    Source: CNN

  • Veterans in Congress at Lowest Level Since World War II
    January 21, 2011
    "What this reflects is a classic debate of descriptive representation, meaning do I need a person that is a member of my group to adequately represent my views in Congress."

    Michele Swers, associate professor of American government, on lack of military veterans in Congress.

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    Source: CNN

  • Tunisia and the Arab World
    January 20, 2011
    "Disturbance erupted in Tunisia after Mohamed Bouazizi, a young, unemployed graduate, who was going down to sell, like, fruit and vegetables on the street, immolated himself in protest after authorities had beaten him [to] prevent him to work. Then his act crystallized and ignited ... the Tunisians' feelings of humiliation and lack of justice to which they had been subjected for more than 23 years. "

    Noureddine Jebnoun, adjunct assistant professor in Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the catalyst of the Tunisian uprising.

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    Source: NPR

  • Jobs Outlook Careers Headed For The Trash Pile
    January 18, 2011
    “The kinds of jobs that are disappearing are the jobs that pay really well [for] relatively unskilled workers. The combination of technological advancement and off-shoring has shrunk these jobs.”

    Harry Holzer, professor of public policy, on the rise in unemployment rates.

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    Source: Forbes

  • Get Smarter: A Group of Thinkers Explains How
    January 17, 2011
    Humans are “capable of inventing wonders and still capable of forgetting what we’ve done and blundering stupidly on. Our poor cognitive toolkits are always missing a screwdriver when we need it.”

    James O'Donnell, university provost and professor of classics, on the human ability to understand knowledge.

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    Source: Newsweek

  • In New Military, Data Overload Can Be Deadly
    January 16, 2011
    “The whole question we’re asking is whether we can rewire the functioning of the attention system through mindfulness.”

    Elizabeth Stanley, assistant professor of security studies, on her mind-fitness training for the military. 

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    Source: The New York Times

  • LA Times Reveals Advances in Tinnitus Research
    January 13, 2011
    Josef Rauschecker, a neurologist at Georgetown University Medical Center, and his team were covered in the Los Angeles Times for their research on the causes of Tinnitus.
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    Source: Los Angeles Times

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