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Georgetown in the News

Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • Why Washington was Blindsided by Egypt's Cry for Freedom
    February 10, 2011
    "The Egyptian regime, as well as Washington, underestimated the impact of events such as the murder of the young businessman Khaled Sa'id, who was pulled out of a café in Alexandria in June 2010, beaten by the police, and then left dead on the street. If they had visited the Arabic Facebook page started by Wael Ghonim, "We Are All Kaled Sa'id," they might have realized that it was only a matter of when, and not if, the uprising would begin."

    Cynthia P. Schneider, Distinguished Professor in Practice of Diplomacy at the School of Foreign Service, in an op-ed on the Egyptian uprising.
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    Source: CNN

  • After 'Vague' Mubarak Speech, What's Ahead for Him, VP, Army?
    February 10, 2011
    "For several weeks now, millions of Egyptians have been calling for the president to resign. And they didn't get that. And I think things are going to escalate."

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on President Mubarak's speech the day before his resignation.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • How Events In Egypt Are Playing Out Online
    February 10, 2011
    "Well, I think with the growing disenchantment and the rise in the number of protesters in the streets of Egypt and, of course, the scandals as far as international media is concerned, the state television has had to come into the fold. And so, eventually, their programming has at least described the existence of protests but, to a great extent, underestimated and underreported the magnitude of these protests."

    Adel Iskandar, adjunct instructor in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on Egyptian state TV during the recent protests.

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    Source: NPR

  • WHO Study Find Many with High Cholestrol go Untreated
    February 9, 2011
    "As developing countries adopt a western diet - the cholesterol levels are increasing so people need to understand that high cholesterol is a significant risk factor for stroke and heart disease."

    Chelsea Kidwell, professor of neurology, on a major study by the World Health Organization (WHO) that suggests people with high cholesterol are not getting the treatment they need, to avoid such serious diseases as heart attacks and strokes.

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    Source: Voice of America

  • Political Shift Poses Test for Warren
    February 7, 2011
    “Academics have never been afraid to say what they want. Elizabeth has never been afraid to say what she thinks, but she has to be a little more circumspect. She has to be more careful about choosing her battles.’’

    Adam J. Levitin, associate professor of law, on presidential advisor Elizabeth Warren's approach to the Consumer Protection Agency.
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    Source: The Boston Globe

  • Debunking the myth of a 'Eurabia'
    February 6, 2011
    "Such scaremongers claim that Islam is a demographic threat, warning of an impending 'Eurabia' within a few decades. This picture, of a triumphant Islam over a Europe that has lost its Christian roots, has contributed to the growth of anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim political parties and to their notable successes in European elections last year."

    John Esposito, director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, on the myth of 'Eurabia.'

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    Source: San Francisco Chronicle

  • With Upheaval, How Large Is The Opening For Islam?
    February 4, 2011
    "The Islamists will not have the majority in Tunisia or Algeria or even within Egypt with the Brotherhood. They will belong to a coalition government. That's it."

    Noureddine Jebnoun, adjunct assistant professor in Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the possibility of radical Islamists taking control of Egypt.
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    Source: NPR

  • Is The Health Care Law Constitutional?
    February 4, 2011
    “The [individual] mandate's defenders claim that because Congress has the power to draft you into the military, it has the power to make you do anything less than that, including mandating that you send your money to a private company and do business with it for the rest of your life,” he said. “This simply does not follow. The greater power does not include the lesser.”

    Randy Barnett, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Legal Theory, on the individual mandate in President Obama's health care reform package.
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    Source: MSNBC

  • Searching for the Source of Phantom Sounds
    February 4, 2011
    "The nucleus accumbens is the last station in the processing pathway. And it signals, ‘this is bad, bad, bad.’ And the ventromedial prefrontal cortex that would normally make it go away is broken.”

    Josef Rauschecker, professor of neuroscience, on a study he conducted that shows patients with tinnitus are more likely to have structural changes in the brain's prefrontal cortex and hyperactivity in the nucleus accumbens -- a region of the brain known to play a role in pleasure, addiction, aggression and fear.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • Turmoil Grips Egypt as Mubarak Plots Next Move
    February 3, 2011
    "Well, I think that it's become clear to many, to most Egyptians, and hopefully to most people in the military establishment in Egypt, that President Mubarak is now a liability. He is not something that benefits their continuation, because, as long as he is there, as long as he is there as president, or as long as he is in the country, the protests are going to continue, and the image of Egypt is going to be tarnished. There's a potential possibility of the Egyptian-U.S. relationship taking a new form in terms of military aid and so on. So, he is a liability."

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on the liability of having President Mubarak in charge.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • Beyond Our Reach
    February 3, 2011
    “That trade-off is very much on Obama’s plate right now, which is why the administration is treading so carefully. He can voice support for the protesters and recognize their grievances, but … you never know what you’re going to get when the regime falls.”

    Charles Kupchan, a professor at the School of Foreign Service, on President Obama's response to the uprisings in Egypt.

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    Source: National Journal

  • Commentary: Obama's next two years
    February 3, 2011
    "Obama steered a middle course, but he also indicated the priorities on which he will not compromise: innovation, education and renewable energy. ...What was missing, though, was a realistic notion of the foreign policy decisions he will have to make. He lauded the ongoing withdrawal from Iraq and impending departure from Afghanistan, but he did not discuss ...North Korea, Iran and the Arab-Israeli conflict. "

    Stephen Wayne, professor of government, on President Obama's 2011 State of the Union address.

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    Source: Shreveport Times

  • Senate Panel Debates Constitutionality of Health-Care Law
    February 2, 2011
    "Mandating that you send your money to a private [insurance] company and do business with it for the rest of your life. This simply does not follow from the constitution."

    Randy Barnett, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Legal Theory, on the individual mandate in President Obama's health care reform package.

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    Source: St. Louis Beacon

  • Can Ensign survive?
    February 2, 2011
    “Ensign faces a difficult road. Past Senate Ethics cases that have involved special counsels such as Bob Packwood for sexual misconduct and the Keating 5 have not ended well for the incumbent senator.”

    Michele Swers, associate professor of American government, on the likelihood of Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.) being challenged from the right in the next primary.

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    Source: Las Vegas Review-Journal

  • Legal, Political Battles Continue Over US Health Care Law
    February 2, 2011
    "In the United States, sovereignty rests with the people, with the citizenry. And if Congress can mandate that you do anything that is convenient to its regulation of the national economy, then that relationship is now reversed. Congress would have all the discretionary power of a king, and the American people would be reduced to its subjects."

    Randy Barnett, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Legal Theory, on President Obama's health care reform law.

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    Source: Voice Of America News

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