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Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • How Did Egypt's Government Shut Halt Internet Access?
    February 16, 2011
    "This is unprecedented in size. Nepal cut off the Internet for a few days at one point. Burma certainly closed down the Internet. But we had 20 million people online in Egypt, 4 million Facebook users, and an economy that was incredibly dependent on the Internet. A lot of the tourism industry uses the Internet for booking tours and hotels. All that came to a stop."

    Michael Nelson, visiting professor of communication, culture and technology, on the Internet shutdown by the Egyptian government.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • Egypt Generals Running Child Care Means Transition Profit Motive
    February 15, 2011
    “The military as an institution, the high-ranking officer corps, certainly has vested economic interests that could be changed or could be put in jeopardy. If the military was completely removed from politics, then there is no question that these interests would be put in jeopardy.”

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics, on the Egyptian military leaders' focus on the armed forces' business interests while running the country.
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    Source: Bloomberg News Service

  • 5 Stupid Mistakes to Avoid When Drinking
    February 15, 2011
    "There's no evidence that taking silymarin or artichoke before a drinking binge will protect the liver. It's theoretically possible, but that study, to my knowledge, hasn't been done. And there's certainly no evidence for this proprietary mixture having a protective effect."

    Adriane Fugh-Berman, associate professor of pharmacology, on the myth of herbal medicines.

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    Source: The Boston Globe

  • Egypt Defies All
    February 14, 2011
    "February 11, 2011 is a monumental day in human history. The resilience and resolve of the Egyptian people have shown the world how a revolutionary movement can rise up to sweep all that lies in its path and create a new reality. I understand that this sounds like hyperbole, but the past two weeks were not exactly a time for conservative assessment." Adel Iskandar, adjunct instructor in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation amid massive protests.
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    Source: The Huffington Post

  • Social Media and Satellite TV: A One-Two Punch Against Mubarak
    February 14, 2011
    "Well, I think it's important to note that 20 percent of the population in Egypt has access to the Internet, which is a slim number, if you think about it. How many of those have access to Facebook? How many of them are prepared to use it for a political -- for a political means?"

    Adel Iskandar, adjunct instructor in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the use of the Internet in the recent Egyptian protests.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • Defining Democracy In Egypt
    February 12, 2011
    "Egyptian democracy, I think, would look like a political spectrum that includes socialist ideas, that includes liberal ideas, certainly capitalist interests would be represented. Interests of business, labor, for the first time in a very long time, I think, would be represented. And there are millions of Egyptian workers who have been very active over the last three or four years. "

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on the future of Egyptian democracy.

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    Source: NPR

  • Post-Mubarak: What Will Egypt Look Like the Day After the Regime Ends?
    February 11, 2011
    "Elections in Egypt, the only certainty about them is that they have never been free and fair in the last 30 years or so. And what that means is that people rationally don’t participate in elections."

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on the impending elections in Egypt.

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    Source: Democracy Now!

  • Beyond Mubarak, What Becomes of the Rest?
    February 11, 2011
    “The lessons from Iraq and elsewhere suggest that some sort of reconciliation and reincorporation is best. People connected in any way to the Egyptian regime fear they will be completely shut out. So you hope the opposition are able to be magnanimous, for lack of a better word. There needs to be justice — but there needs also to be some kind of orderly incorporation to piece together the Egypt of the future.”

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on the future of democracy in Egypt.
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    Source: The Star (Toronto, CA)

  • Why Washington was Blindsided by Egypt's Cry for Freedom
    February 10, 2011
    "The Egyptian regime, as well as Washington, underestimated the impact of events such as the murder of the young businessman Khaled Sa'id, who was pulled out of a café in Alexandria in June 2010, beaten by the police, and then left dead on the street. If they had visited the Arabic Facebook page started by Wael Ghonim, "We Are All Kaled Sa'id," they might have realized that it was only a matter of when, and not if, the uprising would begin."

    Cynthia P. Schneider, Distinguished Professor in Practice of Diplomacy at the School of Foreign Service, in an op-ed on the Egyptian uprising.
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    Source: CNN

  • After 'Vague' Mubarak Speech, What's Ahead for Him, VP, Army?
    February 10, 2011
    "For several weeks now, millions of Egyptians have been calling for the president to resign. And they didn't get that. And I think things are going to escalate."

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on President Mubarak's speech the day before his resignation.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • How Events In Egypt Are Playing Out Online
    February 10, 2011
    "Well, I think with the growing disenchantment and the rise in the number of protesters in the streets of Egypt and, of course, the scandals as far as international media is concerned, the state television has had to come into the fold. And so, eventually, their programming has at least described the existence of protests but, to a great extent, underestimated and underreported the magnitude of these protests."

    Adel Iskandar, adjunct instructor in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on Egyptian state TV during the recent protests.

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    Source: NPR

  • WHO Study Find Many with High Cholestrol go Untreated
    February 9, 2011
    "As developing countries adopt a western diet - the cholesterol levels are increasing so people need to understand that high cholesterol is a significant risk factor for stroke and heart disease."

    Chelsea Kidwell, professor of neurology, on a major study by the World Health Organization (WHO) that suggests people with high cholesterol are not getting the treatment they need, to avoid such serious diseases as heart attacks and strokes.

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    Source: Voice of America

  • Political Shift Poses Test for Warren
    February 7, 2011
    “Academics have never been afraid to say what they want. Elizabeth has never been afraid to say what she thinks, but she has to be a little more circumspect. She has to be more careful about choosing her battles.’’

    Adam J. Levitin, associate professor of law, on presidential advisor Elizabeth Warren's approach to the Consumer Protection Agency.
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    Source: The Boston Globe

  • Debunking the myth of a 'Eurabia'
    February 6, 2011
    "Such scaremongers claim that Islam is a demographic threat, warning of an impending 'Eurabia' within a few decades. This picture, of a triumphant Islam over a Europe that has lost its Christian roots, has contributed to the growth of anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim political parties and to their notable successes in European elections last year."

    John Esposito, director of the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, on the myth of 'Eurabia.'

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    Source: San Francisco Chronicle

  • With Upheaval, How Large Is The Opening For Islam?
    February 4, 2011
    "The Islamists will not have the majority in Tunisia or Algeria or even within Egypt with the Brotherhood. They will belong to a coalition government. That's it."

    Noureddine Jebnoun, adjunct assistant professor in Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the possibility of radical Islamists taking control of Egypt.
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    Source: NPR

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