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Georgetown in the News

Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • An interview With Ex-Union President Andy Stern About the Fight in Wisconsin
    February 27, 2011
    "The unions managed to strip the fiscal issues out from all of it, and [Wisconsin Gov. Scott] Walker made such a big mistake exempting the police and firemen's unions. He mobilized union members in a way that hasn't happened in a long time, and brought them together with students and other progressives. It's turned into a Democrat versus Republican fight, not a good-government versus bad-government fight." Andy Stern, senior research fellow at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute, on the union protests in Wisconsin.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • A 'Vacuum' In Libya: An Opening For Al-Qaida?
    February 26, 2011
    "I think Libya presents to al-Qaida one of the best opportunities to reinvigorate itself and its message in the Middle East and especially in North Africa. Al-Qaida's got lots of raw material, as it were, as well as a historical legacy to work with in Libya. And a vacuum in Libya, I think, is something that al-Qaida is poised perhaps to take advantage of." Bruce Hoffman, professor in the School of Foreign Service and director of the Center for Peace and Security Studies, on al-Qaida's influence in Libya.
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    Source: NPR

  • Fate of Gaddafi Inner Circle Also at Stake
    February 25, 2011
    "[Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi] is very dangerous as head of national security. He is organizing a kind of counteroffensive." Noureddine Jebnoun, adjunct assistant professor in Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the Libyan leader's response the protests.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • Convenient Scapegoat: Public Workers Under Assault
    February 25, 2011
    "A powerful wave of opposition against public sector unions is now taking shape, strengthened by Republican control of the federal budget-setting process in the House of Representatives, which is likely to stifle further aid to hard-pressed states and cities. These circumstances are setting up 2011 to be the worst year for government workers since collective bargaining first came to government a half-century ago. " Joseph McCartin, associate professor of history and director of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, on union concern over Republican control in state houses across the country.
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    Source: Dissent Magazine

  • American Colleges Discuss Their Next Moves in Protest-Riven Middle East
    February 23, 2011

    "That's what's disturbing. We're looking at a road that has not yet been paved."

    Kathy Bellows, executive director for the Office of International Programs, on the planning of future programs in Egypt amidst uncertainty.

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    Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

  • Egypt's Future Needs a Strong Legislature
    February 23, 2011

    "In the past month, we have witnessed a stunning wave of protests that forced Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian strongman, from the presidential mansion. What comes next? Does Egypt have a shot at lasting democracy, or is it fated to slide from one form of authoritarianism to another?"

    Matthew Kroenig, assistant professor of government, co-wrote an op-ed on what comes next for Egypt.

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    Source: CNN

  • Swimming Against the Tide in Tehran
    February 16, 2011
    "We’ve seen this movie before, and in Egypt and Tunisia, so far at least, it has had a surprise happy ending. Many U.S. observers look to the hated regime in Tehran as next in line, reasoning that before this latest wave of protest the regime faced demonstrations over its rigging of the 2009 election, and that discontent is only likely to grow. In Iran, however, the picture is grimmer and the odds of revolution lower."

    Daniel Byman, professor of security studies, on the odds of a revolution in Iran similar to what has happened in Tunisia and Egypt.
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    Source: Brookings

  • How Did Egypt's Government Shut Halt Internet Access?
    February 16, 2011
    "This is unprecedented in size. Nepal cut off the Internet for a few days at one point. Burma certainly closed down the Internet. But we had 20 million people online in Egypt, 4 million Facebook users, and an economy that was incredibly dependent on the Internet. A lot of the tourism industry uses the Internet for booking tours and hotels. All that came to a stop."

    Michael Nelson, visiting professor of communication, culture and technology, on the Internet shutdown by the Egyptian government.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • Egypt Generals Running Child Care Means Transition Profit Motive
    February 15, 2011
    “The military as an institution, the high-ranking officer corps, certainly has vested economic interests that could be changed or could be put in jeopardy. If the military was completely removed from politics, then there is no question that these interests would be put in jeopardy.”

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics, on the Egyptian military leaders' focus on the armed forces' business interests while running the country.
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    Source: Bloomberg News Service

  • 5 Stupid Mistakes to Avoid When Drinking
    February 15, 2011
    "There's no evidence that taking silymarin or artichoke before a drinking binge will protect the liver. It's theoretically possible, but that study, to my knowledge, hasn't been done. And there's certainly no evidence for this proprietary mixture having a protective effect."

    Adriane Fugh-Berman, associate professor of pharmacology, on the myth of herbal medicines.

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    Source: The Boston Globe

  • Egypt Defies All
    February 14, 2011
    "February 11, 2011 is a monumental day in human history. The resilience and resolve of the Egyptian people have shown the world how a revolutionary movement can rise up to sweep all that lies in its path and create a new reality. I understand that this sounds like hyperbole, but the past two weeks were not exactly a time for conservative assessment." Adel Iskandar, adjunct instructor in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation amid massive protests.
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    Source: The Huffington Post

  • Social Media and Satellite TV: A One-Two Punch Against Mubarak
    February 14, 2011
    "Well, I think it's important to note that 20 percent of the population in Egypt has access to the Internet, which is a slim number, if you think about it. How many of those have access to Facebook? How many of them are prepared to use it for a political -- for a political means?"

    Adel Iskandar, adjunct instructor in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the use of the Internet in the recent Egyptian protests.

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    Source: PBS Newshour

  • Defining Democracy In Egypt
    February 12, 2011
    "Egyptian democracy, I think, would look like a political spectrum that includes socialist ideas, that includes liberal ideas, certainly capitalist interests would be represented. Interests of business, labor, for the first time in a very long time, I think, would be represented. And there are millions of Egyptian workers who have been very active over the last three or four years. "

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on the future of Egyptian democracy.

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    Source: NPR

  • Post-Mubarak: What Will Egypt Look Like the Day After the Regime Ends?
    February 11, 2011
    "Elections in Egypt, the only certainty about them is that they have never been free and fair in the last 30 years or so. And what that means is that people rationally don’t participate in elections."

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on the impending elections in Egypt.

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    Source: Democracy Now!

  • Beyond Mubarak, What Becomes of the Rest?
    February 11, 2011
    “The lessons from Iraq and elsewhere suggest that some sort of reconciliation and reincorporation is best. People connected in any way to the Egyptian regime fear they will be completely shut out. So you hope the opposition are able to be magnanimous, for lack of a better word. There needs to be justice — but there needs also to be some kind of orderly incorporation to piece together the Egypt of the future.”

    Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arabic politics at the School of Foreign Service, on the future of democracy in Egypt.
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    Source: The Star (Toronto, CA)

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