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Georgetown in the News

Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • Tunisia Not Sudden Paradise After President's Ouster
    March 1, 2011
    "The best thing to do is to postpone as long as possible these elections, in order to provide time and space for new parties to organize. Otherwise, you will help the entrenched incumbents and end up with the same party [in power] with a new name."

    Noureddine Jebnoun, adjunct assistant professor in Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the process towards elections in Tunisia.
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    Source: NPR

  • The West and Russia Real Rapprochement on the Horizon
    March 1, 2011
    "These are not the best of times for the Euro-Atlantic community. The European Union (EU) is struggling to shore up the Euro-zone – a task that has exposed worrisome political fissures and raised troubling questions about the overall health of the Union. Meanwhile, the United States is suffering through a prolonged economic downturn and an era of intense political polarization."

    Charles Kupchan, a professor at the School of Foreign Service, on the European-U.S. relationship.
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    Source: Center for European Policy Analysis

  • Wheres Mubaraks Money Ask Front Man Hussein Salem
    March 1, 2011

    "There were many, many weapons, and billions of dollars in armaments that needed to be shipped. It was an enormous job... Hussein was the façade for the Mubarak family."

    Ibrahim Oweiss, professor emeritus of economics, on former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's front man Hussein Salem.

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    Source: ABC News

  • As Regimes Fall in Arab World, Al Qaeda Sees History Fly By
    February 28, 2011
    “So far — and I emphasize so far — the score card looks pretty terrible for Al Qaeda. Democracy is bad news for terrorists. The more peaceful channels people have to express grievances and pursue their goals, the less likely they are to turn to violence.”

    Paul Pillar, professor of security studies, on how the rise in democracies can only hurt Al Qaeda.
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    Source: The New York Times

  • Can a government shutdown be avoided
    February 28, 2011

    “Democrats look like they’re likely to agree to [the stop gap measure] because Republicans didn’t put any poison pills into their cut bill. Basically, they took money that hasn't been spent yet, and that's what is being cut.”

    Michele Swers, associate professor of American government, on the $4 billion spending proposal that would keep the government afloat through March 18 -- pushing back a possible government shutdown.

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    Source: ABC 2 News (WMAR-TV, Baltimore MD)

  • A New Arab World Is Coming, With or Without U.S.
    February 28, 2011
    "The young Arab women and men of Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain, Libya and Yemen have proved that they are willing to die to build a better future. They yearn for freedom, opportunity and democracy. It is doubtful they will accept anything less. It may take time and it may get messy, but in the words of one of the Tahrir Square organizers, 'The new great awakening is unfolding across the Arab world.' " Cynthia Schneider, distinguished professor in practice of diplomacy at the School of Foreign Service, on the turmoil in the Middle East.
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    Source: CNN

  • Saudi Man Charged with Plotting Terrorist Attack
    February 27, 2011

    "The heartening development in this is that the public (the chemical company), by alerting the authorities, played a role in tripping him up."

    Bruce Hoffman, professor of peace and security studies, on the recent efforts of a man in Texas to commit an act of terrorism.

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    Source: USA Today

  • Obamas Risky Move in Florida
    February 27, 2011

    “Having lost one game of chicken when it came to the severability of the mandate, the government is now challenging the same judge to back down on whether his decision is binding. Seems like a risky move."

    Randy Barnett, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Legal Theory, on the Department of Justice asking for clarification in the Florida ruling that struck down the individual mandate of health care reform.

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    Source: Politico

  • An interview With Ex-Union President Andy Stern About the Fight in Wisconsin
    February 27, 2011
    "The unions managed to strip the fiscal issues out from all of it, and [Wisconsin Gov. Scott] Walker made such a big mistake exempting the police and firemen's unions. He mobilized union members in a way that hasn't happened in a long time, and brought them together with students and other progressives. It's turned into a Democrat versus Republican fight, not a good-government versus bad-government fight." Andy Stern, senior research fellow at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute, on the union protests in Wisconsin.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • A 'Vacuum' In Libya: An Opening For Al-Qaida?
    February 26, 2011
    "I think Libya presents to al-Qaida one of the best opportunities to reinvigorate itself and its message in the Middle East and especially in North Africa. Al-Qaida's got lots of raw material, as it were, as well as a historical legacy to work with in Libya. And a vacuum in Libya, I think, is something that al-Qaida is poised perhaps to take advantage of." Bruce Hoffman, professor in the School of Foreign Service and director of the Center for Peace and Security Studies, on al-Qaida's influence in Libya.
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    Source: NPR

  • Fate of Gaddafi Inner Circle Also at Stake
    February 25, 2011
    "[Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi] is very dangerous as head of national security. He is organizing a kind of counteroffensive." Noureddine Jebnoun, adjunct assistant professor in Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the Libyan leader's response the protests.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • Convenient Scapegoat: Public Workers Under Assault
    February 25, 2011
    "A powerful wave of opposition against public sector unions is now taking shape, strengthened by Republican control of the federal budget-setting process in the House of Representatives, which is likely to stifle further aid to hard-pressed states and cities. These circumstances are setting up 2011 to be the worst year for government workers since collective bargaining first came to government a half-century ago. " Joseph McCartin, associate professor of history and director of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, on union concern over Republican control in state houses across the country.
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    Source: Dissent Magazine

  • American Colleges Discuss Their Next Moves in Protest-Riven Middle East
    February 23, 2011

    "That's what's disturbing. We're looking at a road that has not yet been paved."

    Kathy Bellows, executive director for the Office of International Programs, on the planning of future programs in Egypt amidst uncertainty.

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    Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

  • Egypt's Future Needs a Strong Legislature
    February 23, 2011

    "In the past month, we have witnessed a stunning wave of protests that forced Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian strongman, from the presidential mansion. What comes next? Does Egypt have a shot at lasting democracy, or is it fated to slide from one form of authoritarianism to another?"

    Matthew Kroenig, assistant professor of government, co-wrote an op-ed on what comes next for Egypt.

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    Source: CNN

  • Swimming Against the Tide in Tehran
    February 16, 2011
    "We’ve seen this movie before, and in Egypt and Tunisia, so far at least, it has had a surprise happy ending. Many U.S. observers look to the hated regime in Tehran as next in line, reasoning that before this latest wave of protest the regime faced demonstrations over its rigging of the 2009 election, and that discontent is only likely to grow. In Iran, however, the picture is grimmer and the odds of revolution lower."

    Daniel Byman, professor of security studies, on the odds of a revolution in Iran similar to what has happened in Tunisia and Egypt.
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    Source: Brookings

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