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Georgetown in the News

Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • King Hearings To Revisit 'Radical Muslim' Question
    March 10, 2011

    "It's perfectly legitimate to investigate radicalism. There has been an increase in people drawn to these movements, and there has been a rapidity to their radicalization — though their numbers remain infinitesimal."

    Bruce Hoffman, professor of peace and security studies, on congressional hearings held by Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.)on U.S.-born Islamic extremism.

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    Source: NPR

  • Mexican Church Takes a Closer Look at Donors
    March 7, 2011

    “This is an endemic problem. If they just issue statements and don’t analyze the roots of the situation, they aren’t going to change anything.”

    Joseph Palacios, assistant professor in the Center for Latin American Studies, on the Catholic Church's response to the drug cartels in Mexico.

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    Source: The New York Times

  • Why the Mideast Revolts Will Help Al-Qaeda
    March 4, 2011

    "Each new regime is likely to host a more open, religion-friendly environment for speech, assembly and press freedoms than did Mubarak and his ilk. So it will be easier for media-savvy Islamist groups - whether peaceful or militant - to proselytize, publish and foment without immediate threat of arrest and incarceration."

    Michael Scheuer, adjunct professor of security studies, on the revolutions happening in North Africa and the Middle East.

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    Source: The Washington Post

  • Why Lousy Jobs Numbers Look Good (And Vice Versa)
    March 4, 2011

    "After you see the jobs number go up above the 200,000 range. Then you want to see whether that will extend beyond a couple of months."

    Harry Holzer, professor of public policy, on the 150,000 jobs gained in February 2011.

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    Source: NPR

  • Job Growth Still Won't Be Big Enough for a While
    March 4, 2011

    "Well, [the 1990s tech boom] was kind of fun, frankly.  Because it was not hard to crow about those numbers."

    Harry Holzer, professor of public policy, on what kind of numbers it would take to decrease unemployment.

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    Source: Marketplace

  • Listening to Music can Prompt the Brain to send Positive Signals Throughout the Body
    March 4, 2011

    "We have musicians here who play for people who have just come out of a surgery-a flautist goes up and plays for them and these patients, who are in tremendous pain, at the end of the playing, they are almost pain-free."

    Nancy Morgan, director of the Arts & Humanities Program at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehsive Cancer Center, on how providing music therapy programs increases dopamine levels to the brain, and helps to heal patients.

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    Source: Washington Post

  • Gulf War Illness 20 Years Later
    March 3, 2011

    "Let's understand what the mechanisms are, and let's find drugs, new drugs, and new combinations of medicine to treat them."

    James Baraniuk, associate professor of medicine, on conducting a series of clinical trials for veterans with Gulf War syndrome.

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    Source: Associated Press

  • Tunisia Not Sudden Paradise After President's Ouster
    March 1, 2011
    "The best thing to do is to postpone as long as possible these elections, in order to provide time and space for new parties to organize. Otherwise, you will help the entrenched incumbents and end up with the same party [in power] with a new name."

    Noureddine Jebnoun, adjunct assistant professor in Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, on the process towards elections in Tunisia.
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    Source: NPR

  • The West and Russia Real Rapprochement on the Horizon
    March 1, 2011
    "These are not the best of times for the Euro-Atlantic community. The European Union (EU) is struggling to shore up the Euro-zone – a task that has exposed worrisome political fissures and raised troubling questions about the overall health of the Union. Meanwhile, the United States is suffering through a prolonged economic downturn and an era of intense political polarization."

    Charles Kupchan, a professor at the School of Foreign Service, on the European-U.S. relationship.
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    Source: Center for European Policy Analysis

  • Wheres Mubaraks Money Ask Front Man Hussein Salem
    March 1, 2011

    "There were many, many weapons, and billions of dollars in armaments that needed to be shipped. It was an enormous job... Hussein was the façade for the Mubarak family."

    Ibrahim Oweiss, professor emeritus of economics, on former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's front man Hussein Salem.

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    Source: ABC News

  • As Regimes Fall in Arab World, Al Qaeda Sees History Fly By
    February 28, 2011
    “So far — and I emphasize so far — the score card looks pretty terrible for Al Qaeda. Democracy is bad news for terrorists. The more peaceful channels people have to express grievances and pursue their goals, the less likely they are to turn to violence.”

    Paul Pillar, professor of security studies, on how the rise in democracies can only hurt Al Qaeda.
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    Source: The New York Times

  • Can a government shutdown be avoided
    February 28, 2011

    “Democrats look like they’re likely to agree to [the stop gap measure] because Republicans didn’t put any poison pills into their cut bill. Basically, they took money that hasn't been spent yet, and that's what is being cut.”

    Michele Swers, associate professor of American government, on the $4 billion spending proposal that would keep the government afloat through March 18 -- pushing back a possible government shutdown.

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    Source: ABC 2 News (WMAR-TV, Baltimore MD)

  • A New Arab World Is Coming, With or Without U.S.
    February 28, 2011
    "The young Arab women and men of Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain, Libya and Yemen have proved that they are willing to die to build a better future. They yearn for freedom, opportunity and democracy. It is doubtful they will accept anything less. It may take time and it may get messy, but in the words of one of the Tahrir Square organizers, 'The new great awakening is unfolding across the Arab world.' " Cynthia Schneider, distinguished professor in practice of diplomacy at the School of Foreign Service, on the turmoil in the Middle East.
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    Source: CNN

  • Saudi Man Charged with Plotting Terrorist Attack
    February 27, 2011

    "The heartening development in this is that the public (the chemical company), by alerting the authorities, played a role in tripping him up."

    Bruce Hoffman, professor of peace and security studies, on the recent efforts of a man in Texas to commit an act of terrorism.

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    Source: USA Today

  • Obamas Risky Move in Florida
    February 27, 2011

    “Having lost one game of chicken when it came to the severability of the mandate, the government is now challenging the same judge to back down on whether his decision is binding. Seems like a risky move."

    Randy Barnett, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Legal Theory, on the Department of Justice asking for clarification in the Florida ruling that struck down the individual mandate of health care reform.

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    Source: Politico

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