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Georgetown in the News

Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • Al-Qaida's Paper Trail: A 'Treasure Trove' For U.S.
    May 31, 2011
    "I think this treasure trove of intelligence reflects the fixation or the preoccupation that al-Qaida always had with massive record-keeping. [That] may be an effective way to run any organization, but also results in a windfall of intelligence to any counterterrorist agency or intelligence community charged with dismantling that organization." Bruce Hoffman, professor of peace and security studies, on the windfall of intelligence in the wake of the raid, capture and death of Osama bin Laden.
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    Source: NPR

  • Young Athletes Use Fewer Drugs but More Alcohol
    May 30, 2011
    "These are young people who are typically under pressure to perform athletically and academically [and] drinking might be a coping mechanism." Darren Mays, a researcher at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, on his findings while studying alcohol consumption in adolescents.
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    Source: Reuters

  • Egyptian Protesters Seek to Speed Up Reforms
    May 28, 2011
    "The Brotherhood has always been an accommodating, risk-adverse group ... not into radical change or escalating conflict." Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics, on the Muslim Brotherhood and their, so far, quiet involvement in the current reform-minded protests.
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    Source: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

  • Documenting Major Gaps in Salaries
    May 26, 2011
    "The bottom line is that getting a degree matters, but what you take matters more." Anthony Carnevale, director and research professor of the Center on Education and the Workforce, on the benefits of a college education in the job market.
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    Source: The Kansas City (Mo.) Star

  • How Will Mubarak's Trial Shape Egypt's Transition?
    May 25, 2011
    "Millions of people demonstrated in Thahir and other squares, calling for President Mubarak to be held accountable as well as regime officials. We have to remember that he stepped down, or was removed on February 11th and was a free man until about April 15th." Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics, speaking about the possible future prosecution of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.
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    Source: PBS NewsHour

  • Egypt's Mubarak Could Face Death Penalty
    May 24, 2011
    “No one is calling for a kangaroo court. They are not calling for him to be tried and executed in the middle of Tahrir Square. But people want to see justice done. They support the legal investigation into what his involvement was in the deaths of 800 plus people during the revolution. There's no question he was involved in that.” Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics, on the possible outcomes for former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak if taken to court.
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    Source: PBS

  • The Recession’s Biggest Victims
    May 23, 2011
    “[The recovery's] been very, very slow, and black men are showing the least progress with little sign so far that unemployment rates are improving.” Harry Holzer, professor of public policy, on how black men have been the hardest hit by the recession.
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    Source: MSNBC

  • Chicago Trial to Put Pakistan Spy Agency on the Spot
    May 23, 2011
    “It is a big deal because it is part of an evolving revelation of things we already knew. For those, in the wake of bin Laden, who are out for blood, this is another opportunity to bludgeon Pakistan for its various, numerous shortcomings in the war on terror.” Christine Fair, assistant professor in the School of Foreign Service, on the trial of Pakistani-Canadian Tahawwur Rana for the Mumbai terrorist attacks in 2008.
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    Source: NPR

  • The 'O' Effect and the 2012 GOP Race
    May 23, 2011
    “[Oprah] has had a tremendous cultural impact. She's a role model, a life coach, even acts as spiritual leader. If you take a look at her fan web page and all of the fan comments, it's clear that they are so sad she is ending her show ... You can tell that they have developed real personal relationships with her. In communications literature this is something called parasocial interaction. It's where views form feelings of intimacy with on-screen performers.” Kim Meltzer, assistant professor in the communications, culture and technology, on the end of Oprah Winfrey's talk show after 25 years on air.
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    Source: TBD

  • Getting Real About Funding Mideast Reform
    May 21, 2011
    “Many people have spoken about an Arab martial fund,not simply limited to debt relief, to really make an impact on many of these countries.” Samer Shehata, assistant professor of Arab politics, on a possible way to fund Middle East reform.
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    Source: NPR

  • Food Fight Looms Over North Korean 'Famine'
    May 21, 2011
    “I think the administration would have a defensible position to give food.” Victor Cha, director of Asian studies and the D.S. Song-Korea Foundation Chair in Asian Studies and Government, on possible agreements between the U.S. and North Korea.
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    Source: Asia Times

  • Risks Mount From U.S. Exchanges Big China Push
    May 20, 2011
    “The only thing the exchanges have, really, is their brand image. If their brand image gets tarnished by fraudulent companies, it's going to make it really hard to attract listings.” James Angel, associate professor of finance, on the possible problems with Chinese initial public offerings coming to U.S. exchanges.
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    Source: Reuters

  • Pakistanis Want a Better Future, Just Like Us
    May 18, 2011
    “As Americans try to decipher where the Pakistan government, military and intelligence services stand in the fight against extremists, ordinary Pakistanis are busy trying to make their country a better place. In many cases, they do his in spite of, or, to put it more kindly, in lieu of their bureaucracy.” Cynthia Schneider, distinguished professor in practice of diplomacy at the School of Foreign Service, co-wrote an article on Pakistan bureaucracy.
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    Source: CNN

  • U.S. Aid in Pakistan: Where's the Money Going?
    May 18, 2011
    “One of the things we should be doing is training the police, but we’re not doing it.... Pakistanis are not letting us. They want the Army to do everything.” Christine Fair, assistant professor in the School of Foreign Service, on what U.S. foreign aid should be used for in Pakistan.
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    Source: The Christian Science Monitor

  • Mini Flash Crashes Worry Traders
    May 16, 2011
    “We've made good progress, but we need to put better [safeguards] in place for all stocks.” James Angel, associate professor of finance, on the anniversary of the flash crash, when the Dow Jones industrials fell roughly 900 points, only to quickly recover.
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    Source: USA Today

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