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Georgetown in the News

Georgetown University News

News organizations often turn to Georgetown faculty members for insightful, expert commentary on current events. From opinions on unfolding events to providing in-depth analysis, Georgetown scholars and researchers appear daily in local, national and international news reports.

The Office of Communications collects and archives news reports featuring expert faculty commentary. To read or listen to Georgetown faculty members in the news, visit the GU in the News archive.

Journalists seeking faculty experts for stories should visit the Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide for a list of contacts by subject area.
Georgetown University Faculty Experts Guide

  • Pinterest’s gender trouble
    May 2, 2012
    “I remember years ago people saying, ‘Online communication is going to be gender neutral. This is great!’ But the same patterns show up everywhere. Anything associated with women is thought to have less value." Deborah Tannen, professor of linguistics, on the growing gender divide on social media sites.
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    Source: Salon

  • Leaders in Beijing Feared Arab Spring Could Infect China
    May 1, 2012
    “The leadership is quite insecure now,” Michael Green, associate professor in the School of Foreign Service, on the current Chinese political situation in light of the recent government scandal.
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    Source: Bloomberg

  • Bin Laden anniversary delicate moment for Obama, Romney
    April 25, 2012
    "This is a moment [for Obama] to be presidential and not worry so much about the campaign. The emphasis is that America will avenge itself, and we do take action when we are attacked. Not to be gloating, but to be strong." Clyde Wilcox, professor of government, on the anniversary of Osama Bin Laden's death.
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    Source: Reuters

  • If The Health Care Overhaul Goes Down, Could Medicare Follow?
    April 24, 2012
    "The Affordable Care Act has become part and parcel of the Medicare system, encouraging providers to deliver better, more integrated, better coordinated care, at lower cost. To all of a sudden eliminate that would be highly disruptive," Judy Feder, professor of public policy, on the potential consequences of striking down the act.
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    Source: NPR

  • Republican Groups Help Romney Fill Cash Gap With Obama
    April 23, 2012
    "So far, the Romney campaign cannot match Obama’s technology nor its outreach in the field. Obama’s early start gives him an advantage here." Stephen Wayne, professor of government, on Obama's campaign fundraising advantages.
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    Source: Bloomberg

  • What France's Presidential Race Means for the U.S. and the World
    April 20, 2012
    "France is preparing for a presidential vote that has potentially major consequences for the eurozone, European integration, and transatlantic relations," Charles Kupchan, professor in the School of Foreign Service, on the circumstances surrounding the upcoming French presidential election.
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    Source: The Atlantic

  • Bill Could Complicate U.S.-Russia Relations
    April 20, 2012
    "Is public naming of people, is that more productive? Or is more behind the scenes and out of the public eye discussions about specific human rights cases, is that more productive?" Angela Stent, professor of government, on a controversial bill regarding Russian human rights violators and its potential consequences for US-Russia relations.
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    Source: NPR

  • Television isn't the only form of screen time
    April 18, 2012
    “Parents tell me, ‘My child doesn’t watch TV.' ‘But what about DVDs?’ I ask, and they say, ‘Oh yeah.’ They don’t count that. They don’t count watching something on the laptop." Rachel Barr, associate professor of psychology, on how different parents define "screen time" for their children.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • Emancipation Day 2012: More meaningful than ever
    April 13, 2012
    "This city has evolved as a center of black advancement, education, social discourse and, most significantly, political empowerment." Maurice Jackson, associate professor of history, on the vibrant African American culture in Washington.
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    Source: The Washington Post

  • 'Mommy wars' highlight fierce battle for women voters
    April 13, 2012
    “Romney is in Bob Dole territory when it comes to the gender gap.” Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's current position with women voters.
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    Source: MSNBC

  • RPT-Obama looks to Americas summit to lift Latino support
    April 12, 2012
    "Gaining the Hispanic vote is so important (to Obama) in a few critical states. He's got to do his utmost to show not only his interest (in Latin America), but his presidential stature." Stephen Wayne, professor of government, on Obama's attempts to bolster support before the upcoming election.
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    Source: Reuters

  • Should the U.S. Focus on Exporting Services?
    April 11, 2012
    “There is this huge infrastructure boom where these big, fast-growing economies are going to need to build out their roads, sewers, telecommunications networks, factories, airports, harbors, you name it," said J. Bradford Jensen, an economist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics and author of a recent book on global services trade.
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    Source: The New York Times

  • For a Middle-Class Life, College Is Crucial
    April 9, 2012
    "Since the '80s access to college is what has distinguished the middle class from the growing number of low-income Americans." Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, on the growing necessity of a college education.
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    Source: The New York Times

  • Understanding the Organ Transplant Process
    March 29, 2012
    "The ethical issue that I think is being neglected is what is required by the standard of fairness or equity. So we don't want to just base our decision on how good the outcome will be. We want to treat everybody in a public system like a transplant system fairly." --Robert Veatch, professor of medical ethics at the Georgetown University Kennedy Institute for Bioethics, on the ethics concerning the allocation of organ transplants.
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  • Divergent forces in NK fomenting crisis: Cha
    March 28, 2012
    “I believe that the forty-fifth president of the United States will contend with a major crisis of governance in North Korea before he or she leaves office,” Victor Cha, professor in the School of Foreign Service, on the uncertain political future of North Korea.
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